Author Topic: Walking around corfu  (Read 274988 times)

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Online kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #660 on: August 30, 2022, 10:56:48 AM »



Hi Neil

ANSWER: The green pod you saw on your Campsis radicans (Trumpet creeper) contains the seeds for a new generation of trumpet creeper vines. It will dry, split open and spill its seeds that could potentially grow into other trumpet creeper vines if they fall into a hospitable spot.

was right first time 🤣 kev

Offline Eggy

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #661 on: August 30, 2022, 11:38:11 AM »
Well dun U
Maybe I will keep a pod or two?
Negg

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #662 on: August 30, 2022, 02:29:50 PM »


HI

oxeye daisy

Leucanthemum  commonly known as the ox-eye daisy, oxeye daisy, dog daisy, marguerite (French: Marguerite commune, "common marguerite") and other common names, is a widespread flowering plant native to Southern and  Central  Europe and the temperate regions of Asia, and an introduced plant to North America, Australia and New Zealand.  is a genus of flowering plants in the aster family, Asteraceae. It is mainly distributed in southern and central Europe. Some species are known on other continents as introduced species, and some are cultivated as ornamental plants.
The name Leucanthemum derives from the Greek words λευκός – leukos ("white") and ἄνθεμον – anthemon ("flower").

climate zones this plant can grow are 1- 24

From USA

Southen Europe countries [  Albania, Andorra, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece, Italy, Malta, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovenia, Spain, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Yugoslavia ]

Central Europe countries [ Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Poland, Slovakia, Switzerland and the United Kingdom ]

Family:   Asteraceae
Subfamily:   Asteroideae
Tribe:   Anthemideae
Genus:   Leucanthemum

HABITAT
Siol = Chalk Clay Loma Sand grassland perennial wildflower, growing in a variety of plant communities including meadows and fields, under scrub and open-canopy forests, and in disturbed areas. Fullsun  Part shade Dry Wet Damp along the side of the road
Grows up to 1-2 ft. tall and wide and more wide


Leucanthemum species are perennial plants growing from red-tipped rhizomes. The plant produces one erect stem usually reaching 40 to 130 centimeters tall, but known to exceed 2 meters at times. It is branching or unbranched and hairy to hairless. Some species have mainly basal leaves, and some have leaves along the stem, as well. Some leaves are borne on petioles, and others are sessile, attached to the stem at their bases. They vary in shape, and some are lobed or toothed.
The flower head is solitary, paired, or in a group of three on the stem. The base of the head is layered with up to 60 or more rough-edged phyllaries. The Leucanthemum head has about 13 to 34 ray florets of various widths, occasionally more, and rarely none. The ray florets are always white but fade pink with age. The head has over 100 yellow disc florets at the center. The fruit is a ribbed, hairless cypsela

Here's a weed for you fringe foodies.  Oxeye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare).  The unopened flower heads of oxeye daisies, when marinated, can be used in a similar manner to capers.  Also the young leaves can be used in salads but they are quite bitter so I am not rushing out to harvest any oxeye to replace my iceberg lettuce.

If you are grazing sheep then don't worry about this weed as sheep will happily eat it, as will goats and horses.  Cows and pigs don't like the bitter taste, though, and beef or dairy farmers can lose a lot of valuable pasture if this beast gets established, so for you, this weed needs to go.

The Scots used to call this weed "gools" and back in medieval times the wheat farmer with the most "gools" in their fields had to pay an extra tax.  (Pssst - don't tell the IRD they might get ideas.)


HISTORY
Daisy originated from the Old English meaning, dægesege, from dæges eage meaning “day’s eye” because the flower opens and closes based on sunlight exposure.

Throughout history the Daisy has been associated with many goddesses, Freya and Ostara (Germanic) as well as the Greek goddess Aphrodite. The most notable story is from Roman Mythology and a nymph named Belides. She transformed into a daisy to escape from a Roman god. The latin name for the English Daisy, Bellis, originated from that story.
During the Victorian era, maidens pining for a lost love would pluck a daisy’s petal one by one and chant, “he loves me, he loves me not,” for each petal removed. The last petal predicted the outcome. Maidens were also known to blindly pick a handful of daisies to determine when she would marry. Upon opening her eyes, the number of blossoms in her hand foretold the number of years remained until her wedding date.
The daisy family, Compositae, was classified by a German Botanist, Paul Dietrich Giseke, in 1792.






NONE    Bear in mind that all leucanthemums can be toxic to dogs and cats if ingested, but symptoms are usually mild.

Parks Landscape Gardens Shasta and oxeye daisies (Leucanthemum x superbum and Leucanthemum vulgare) are also edible, but should be used in moderation because of their strong, distinctive flavor.
The tiny flower buds and petals can be eaten in salads and sandwiches. oxeye daisy tea


The plant has been employed successfully in the treatment of whooping cough, asthma and nervous excitability
Some people apply ox-eye daisy directly to the skin for pain and swelling (inflammation), wounds, and burns.
Ox-eye daisy is used for the common cold, cough, bronchitis, fever, sore mouth and throat, liver and gallbladder complaints, loss of appetite, muscle spasms, fluid retention, and tendency toward infection. It is also used as a tonic.


     I wasnt born in the Victorin era but I can remeber picking daises and pulling the leaves off saying he loves me, he loves me not, we had lots of different daises around us.

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Online kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #663 on: August 31, 2022, 04:11:09 PM »


Hi

I found this plant in Arillas the history behind this plant is very interesting crown of thorns I will post when I get back to England and use the desktop computer easier

kev

Offline Eggy

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #664 on: August 31, 2022, 06:14:27 PM »
Kevin
Looks like custard with nuts in plus a tad of rocket.
but......... WOTDOIKNOW?
Negg

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #665 on: September 12, 2022, 01:25:05 PM »


HI

 At your command Mr Eggy have a read

Jujube

Ziziphus jujuba (from Greek ζίζυφον, zízyphon), commonly called jujube (/ˈdʒuːdʒuːb/; sometimes jujuba), red date, Chinese date,is a species of Ziziphus in the buckthorn family Rhamnaceae.
It is a small deciduous tree or shrub reaching a height of 5–12 metres usually with thorny branches The flowers are small, 5 mm yellowish-green petals
This plant has been introduced in Madagascar and grows as an invasive species in the western part of the island
In Arabic-speaking regions the jujube and alternatively the species Z. lotus are closely related to the lote-trees (sing. "sidrah", pl. "sidr") which are mentioned in the Quran
This enables the jujube to grow in mountain or desert habitats, provided there is access to underground water throughout the summer. The jujube, Z. jujuba grows in cooler regions of Asia. Five or more other species of Ziziphus are widely distributed in milder climates to hot deserts of Asia and Africa.
The fruit is an edible oval drupe The mango, olive, apricot, cherry, nectarine, peach, and plum are all examples of drupes.
In botany, a drupe (or stone fruit) is an indehiscent fruit in which an outer fleshy part (exocarp, or skin; and mesocarp, or flesh) surrounds a single shell (the pit, stone, or pyrene) of hardened endocarp with a seed (kernel) inside

The Jujube has been cultivated for over 4,000 years for its edible fruit, and over 400 cultivars have been selected.
The tree tolerates a wide range of temperatures and rainfall, though it requires hot summers and sufficient water for acceptable fruiting. Unlike most of the other species in the genus, it tolerates fairly cold winters, surviving temperatures down to about -15°C. This enables the jujube to grow in desert habitats, provided there is access to underground water through the summer. Virtually no temperature seems to be too high in summertime.






NONE



China and Korea produce a sweetened tea syrup In China, a wine made from jujube fruit is called hong zao jiu
Sometimes pieces of jujube fruit are preserved by storing them in a jar filled with baijiu (Chinese liquor), which allows them to be kept fresh for a long time, especially through the winter. Such jujubes are called jiu zao
 Its hard, oily wood was, along with pear, used for woodcuts to print the world's first books, starting in the 8th century and continuing through the 19th in China and neighboring countries. As many as 2000 copies could be produced from one jujube woodcut
jujube candy
Italy has an alcoholic syrup called brodo di giuggiole
 use it to make jam.
pickle with oil and spices
jujube vinegar
Both China and Korea produce a sweetened tea syrup containing jujube fruit in glass jars, and canned jujube tea or jujube tea in the form of teabags
In traditional Chinese wedding ceremonies, jujube and walnut were often placed in the newly weds' bedroom as a sign of fertility.
Woodcraft
In Korea, the wood is used to make the body of the taepyeongso, a double-reed wind instrument.


          Taepyeongso                    Made from Jujube wood
     



In traditional medicine, the fruit, seeds and bark of jujube have been used to treat anxiety and insomnia, as well as as an appetite stimulant or digestive aid. ... Like dates, jujube fruit is loaded with energy, essential vitamins and minerals, which provide its many health benefits.
Treats Cancer
Improves Sleep And Treats Insomnia
Improves Heart Health And Decreases The Risk Of Heart Disease
Enhances Gastrointestinal Health
Relieves Chronic Constipation
Regulates Circulation
Reduces Inflammation
Reduces Stress and Anxiety
Aids Digestion
Improves Bone Strength
Aids Digestion
Detoxifies Blood
Protects Against Brain Damage
Improves Cognitive Function
Protects Against Seizures
Has Antimicrobial Properties
Benefits Skin Health
Improves Ovarian Health
Removes Breast Milk Toxins
Rich In Vitamin C
Regulates Blood Pressure


Thanks Kef, just picked some from the tree, personally I think it taste like a mixture of apple and pear. Don't forget have to be eaten straight from the tree. See you later. Xx

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Online kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #666 on: September 22, 2022, 12:00:35 PM »


Hi

You have seen thisplant all over Arillas in fields

pink hair grass or pink muhlygrass

Muhlenbergia capillaris
All so commonly known as the hairawn muhly, is a perennial sedge-like plant that grows to be about 30–90 cm (0.98–2.95 ft) tall and 60–90 cm (2.0–3.0 ft) wide. The plant includes a double layer; green, leaf-like structures surround the understory, and purple-pink flowers outgrow them from the bottom up. The plant is a warm-season grass, meaning that leaves begin growth in the summer. During the summer, the leaves stay green, but they morph during the fall to produce a more copper color. The seasonal changes also include the flowers, as they grow out during the fall and stay healthy till the end of autumn. The muhly grows along the border of roads and on plain prairies. The grass clumps into herds, causing bush-like establishments in the area the hairawn muhly inhabits. The flowers are very feathery and add a cloudlike appearance to the top of the grass. It is native to eastern North America and can be used for a multitude of purposes, including ornamental gardening and farming. It was voted 2012 plant of the year by the Garden Club of America.
Muhlenbergiacapillaris (Pink Muhly Grass) is extremely hardy and easy to grow. It grows in clumps with long sharp-edged foliage blades to 3 feet. It is native to the Eastern half of the United States from Texas to Florida.

Family:Poaceae
Genus:Muhlenbergia
Species:M. capillaris
Binomial name
Muhlenbergia capillaris

HABITAT
This grass is found naturally in clay or thin rocky soils, Coastal,Mountains,roadsides,fields,wasteground,
Full sun 6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day Very Dry
Loam Clay Sand

The flowers produce oblong tan or brown seeds that are less than half an inch long. The plants grow in clumps, but do not spread through above-ground or underground stems.
Its hardiness and drought-tolerant properties make it a useful native ornamental grass in land reclamation, and it also has potential as fine fuel for burn management programs to reduce understory






NONE


Landscape:
Landscape Location: Coastal,Container,Naturalized Area,Recreational Play Area,Riparian,Woodland,

Landscape Theme: Children's Garden,Cottage Garden,Drought Tolerant Garden,Native Garden,

Design Feature: Mass Planting,

Attracts: Butterflies,Small Mammals,Songbirds





UNKONW

Offline Eggy

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #667 on: September 22, 2022, 06:22:29 PM »
Can it be transplanted , Kevin , or is pink hair a tad over the top for me?
Negg

Online kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #668 on: September 23, 2022, 10:09:01 AM »


Hi Neil

We can have a go it would make you younger 🤣😂 you can use that shampoo we left you instead of Wendy

Kev

Online kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #669 on: September 24, 2022, 12:55:42 PM »


HI

This plant i have never seen before i was stumped done a bit of research and here it is

Mexican shrimp plant

Justicia brandegeeana Other common names are fountain plant lobster plant Brazilian shower plant
caterpillars  shrimp plant or false hop  is an evergreen shrub in the genus Justicia of the acanthus family Acanthaceae, native to Mexico, and also naturalized in Florida. Justicia is a genus of about 600 species.
This plant can be found in the Tria Adelphia
It grows to 1 m tall (rarely more) with spindly limbs. The leaves are oval, green, 3–7.5 cm long. The flowers are white, extending from red bracts which look somewhat like shrimps, hence the common name "shrimp flower".

Family:Acanthaceae
Genus:Justicia
Species:J. brandegeeana
Binomial name
Justicia brandegeeana

The genus "Justicia" was named after James Justice, a horticulturalist from Scotland (1730-1763). The species epithet "brandegeeana" was named after Townsend Brandegee, a civil engineer from the U.S.A. who published research on plants native to California and Mexico. Although the species epithet is spelled as "brandegeana" in some horticultural books, the correct spelling is "brandegeeana". The common name of Shrimp Plant is derived from the shrimp-like appearance of the arching floral spike.
Justicia can be evergreen perennials or shrubs, with simple leaves and spikes or clusters of tubular, 2-lipped flowers often with conspicuous bracts

HABITAT
It does best in loamy or sandy soil that is well drained. It doesn't do well with wet feet. Well rooted plants are fairly drought tolerant, but like most tropicals, they thrive in high humidity. While they will grow in full sun to partial shade, growing shrimp plants where they receive morning sun is ideal.
Bright light with some direct sunlight is essential for satisfactory production of the colourful bracts.
Normally warm room temperatures suit Justicia brandegeeana plant, but too much heat makes for soft and spindly growth. The recommended winter temperature is 18C (64F).
 in fertile, moist, well-drained soil. It does best in well-drained sandy or loamy soil, but will tolerate most soil types which drain well.

Fruits are egg-shaped or oblong capsules (dry, dehiscent fruits) that are 1 cm long. Each capsule contains 2 to 4 smooth, ovate seeds (3 mm long).
The family Acanthaceae is in the major group Angiosperms (flowering plants). The genus Justicia is in the family Acanthaceae.The genus Justicia comprises about 600 species. Research has been done on the phytochemical components of the numerous Justicia species, showing that they possess antitumor, antiviral and antidiabetic activity. J. brandegeena has not been a topic of phytochemical research until recently







NONE AND SAFE FOR PETS


It is used as a decorative plant in gardens because of its beautiful appearance. It can be grown in hanging baskets or planters because it will not need to be repotted as often as other plants. In addition, it’s an excellent ground cover because of its great looks. The purple color is particularly preferred as a ground cover because it has a soft and appealing look and is also used in floral arrangements and as a background for other plants. Additionally, this plant produces beautiful flowers that will attract hummingbirds and provide lush green foliage with delicate blooms to your garden. It has been observed that this plant becomes more vibrant when it’s planted near other plants with similar needs.


The Huastec people of Mexico have used this Shrimp Plant as traditional medicine for a number of uses, including treating dysentery, wounds and gastrointestinal disorders. More recently, the Justicia genus has been the subject of scientific investigation into its phytochemical constituents and medicinal uses.



Online kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #670 on: September 26, 2022, 10:23:55 AM »


HI

Not all of you would have seen this Insects

Walkingstick

Phasmatodea
 Also called stick insect,  stick-bugs, walking sticks, stick animals, or bug sticks,  European stick insect also know as Phasmida or Phasmatoptera is a genus of insects who's members are variously known as stick insects, stick-bugs, and leaf insects. The genus name is derived from the Ancient Greek φάσμα Phasma meaning an apparition or phantom. referring to their resemblance to vegetation while in fact being animals. Their natural camouflage makes them difficult for predators to detect; still, many species have one of several secondary lines of defense in the form of startle displays, spines or toxic secretions. Stick insects from the genera Phryganistria, Ctenomorpha, and Phobaeticus include the world's longest insects.
As its name suggests, the stick insect resembles the twigs among which it lives, providing it with one of the most efficient natural camouflages on Earth. It and the equally inconspicuous leaf insect comprise the Phasmatodea order, of which there are approximately 3,000 species.

Scientific classificatione
Kingdom:   Animalia
Phylum:   Arthropoda
Class:   Insecta
Cohort:   Polyneoptera
(unranked):   Anartioptera
Magnorder:   Polyorthoptera
Superorder:   Orthopterida
Order:   Phasmatodea
Jacobson & Bianchi, 1902
Subgroups
†Susumanioidea
Timematodea
Verophasmatodea (Euphasmatodea

Members of the order are found on all continents except Antarctica, but they are most abundant in the tropics and subtropics. They are herbivorous, with many species living unobtrusively in the tree canopy. They have an incomplete metamorphosis life cycle with three stages: egg, nymph and adult. Many phasmids are parthenogenic, and do not require fertilized eggs for female offspring to be produced. In hotter climates, they may breed all year round; in more temperate regions, the females lay eggs in the autumn before dying, and the new generation hatches in the spring. Some species have wings and can disperse by flying, while others are more restricted

Description
Phasmids can be relatively large, ranging from 1.5 centimetres (0.6 in) to over 63 centimetres (25 in) in length. Females of the genus Phryganistria are the world's longest insects, measuring up to 64 centimetres (25 in) in total length in the case of an undescribed species, including the outstretched legs. The heaviest species of phasmid is likely to be Heteropteryx dilatata, the females of which may weigh as much as 65 g (2.3 oz)
Phasmids generally mimic their surroundings in color, normally green or brown, although some species are brilliantly colored and others conspicuously striped. Many stick insects have wings, some spectacularly beautiful, while others resemble little more than a stump. A number of species have spines and tubercles on their bodies.
Phasmatodea can be found all over the world except for the Antarctic and Patagonia. They are most numerous in the tropics and subtropics. The greatest diversity is found in Southeast Asia and South America, followed by Australia, Central America, and the southern United States. Over 300 species are known from the island of Borneo, making it the richest place in the world for Phasmatodea

HABITAT
Found predominantly in the tropics and subtropics—although several species live in temperate regions Europe—stick insects thrive in forests and grasslands, where they feed on leaves. Mainly nocturnal creatures, they spend much of their day motionless, hidden under plants.

The life cycle of the stick insect begins when the female deposits her eggs through one of these methods of oviposition: she will either flick her egg to the ground by a movement of the ovipositor or her entire abdomen, carefully place the eggs in the axils of the host plant, bury them in small pits in the soil, or stick the eggs to a substrate, usually a stem or leaf of the food plant. A single female lays from 100 to 1,200 eggs after mating, depending on the species.

HISTORY
Walking stick insects disguised themselves as leaves starting some 126 million years ago, report paleontologists, even before the advent of flowering plants. The fossil discoveries from modern-day Mongolia mark some of the earliest examples of the twig-mimicking stick insects.
The specimens, two females and a male, represent a new species, Cretophasmomima melanogramma, which lived around 130 million years ago. Remarkably well-preserved, they show several traits characteristic of stick insects, including a 'shoulder pad' found at the base of the forewings of all living Phasmatodea, as well as some differences. These ancient stick insects still hadn't evolved a curved notch on their forelegs in which they could hide their head, for example. Likewise, the drastic size difference between modern male and female stick insects still hadn't evolved when these critters were hiding on Cretaceous plants.

Walking sticks and ants share a symbiotic relationship. Ants feed on the fatty deposits from walking stick eggs and give the nymphs a safe place to hatch.
Walking sticks have muscles specifically reserved for breaking off their appendages if they are in danger.
Walking stick nymphs typically eat their own skin when they molt.
Some stick bugs can change color to match their environment, like a chameleon.










Walking sticks aren’t very cool unless they’ve got a sword or a blowgun hidden in them. Fortunately, Mother Nature provided us with her own vision of walkingsticks, insects capable of ejecting a noxious chemical spray with astonishing accuracy, blinding its victims.
Stick insects aren't venomous but if threatened, one will use whatever means necessary to thwart its attacker. Some will regurgitate a nasty substance to put a bad taste in a hungry predator's mouth. Others reflex bleed, oozing a foul-smelling hemolymph from joints in their body.


Stick bugs play an important ecological role as they consume plants leaving room for other species and enrich the soil with their defecation. Walking sticks are primarily nocturnal, meaning they are active at night.

 Stick insects are among the most popular insects kept as pets, mainly due to their unique stick-like appearance and relative ease of care.


Insects and the substances extracted from them have been used as medicinal resources by human cultures all over the world. Besides medicine, these organisms have also played mystical and magical roles in the treatment of several illnesses in a range of cultures.




Offline Eggy

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #671 on: September 27, 2022, 05:57:03 PM »
We have quite a few of these "earabouts" and "wearabouts" and they are not a problem.
Negg

Online kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #672 on: September 28, 2022, 11:04:59 AM »


The stick insects are Fascinating Neil

HI

This plant has so much History I found it growing outside the TRIA

Christ plant,

Euphorbia milii Also known as crown of thorns, Christ plant,  is a species of flowering plant in the spurge family Euphorbiaceae, native to Madagascar. The species name commemorates Baron Milius, once Governor of Réunion, who introduced the species to France in 1821. It is imagined that the species was introduced to the Middle East in ancient times, and legend associates it with the crown of thorns worn by Christ. It is commonly used as an ornamental houseplant that can be grown in warmer climates  areas of Asia and Europe  and the Americas
 Is a large genus of smooth and spiny shrubs and cactus-like succulents from 4” to 20 feet in the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae). Of the more than 1,600 species (including poinsettia, castor bean and cassava),
 E.milii is a smallish tropical species  that has long been grown as a houseplant or ornamental in warm climates. Many cultivars and hybrids have been developed that vary in flower size and color.
 The straight, slender spines, up to 3 cm (1.2 in) long, help it scramble over other plants. The fleshy, green leaves are found mainly on new growth, and are up to 3.5 cm (1.4 in) long and 1.5 cm (0.59 in) broad. The flowers are small, subtended by a pair of conspicuous petal-like bracts, variably red, pink or white, up to 12 mm (0.47 in) broad. Wat Phrik in Thailand claims to be the home of the world's tallest Christ thorn plant. The plant thrives between spring and summer but produces flowers all year round.

Conservation status


Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)
Scientific classificationedit
Kingdom:   Plantae
Clade:   Tracheophytes
Clade:   Angiosperms
Clade:   Eudicots
Clade:   Rosids
Order:   Malpighiales
Family:   Euphorbiaceae
Genus:   Euphorbia
Species:   E. milii
Binomial name
Euphorbia milii

Conservation status
The conservation status of a group of organisms (for instance, a species) indicates whether the group still exists and how likely the group is to become extinct in the near future. Many factors are taken into account when assessing conservation status: not simply the number of individuals remaining, but the overall increase or decrease in the population over time, breeding success rates, and known threats. Various systems of conservation status exist and are in use at international, multi-country, national and local levels as well as for consumer use.

HABITAT
 native to Madagascar and widely cultivated as an ornamental in tropical and temperate regions. It has escaped from cultivation and can be found naturalized in disturbed areas near cultivated areas and dry thickets.  arid habitats, dry thickets and on rocky areas

In the early 1990’s new, large flowered hybrids were produced in Thailand. These Thai Poysean hybrids were likely the result of a mutation, rather than selective breeding (Poysean is the name Chinese immigrants used for E. milii). The economic boom conditions of the time and demand for more exotic types of E. milii fueled the development of hundreds of cultivars, with a huge range of flower colors and plant sizes. Instead of just bright red or yellow, there were also many pastel shades, often with blends of different colors.

HISTORY
 It is imagined that the species was introduced to the Middle East in ancient times, and legend associates it with the crown of thorns worn by Christ.
is due to the thorns and deep red bracts referring to the crown thorn Jesus had to wear during his crucifixion and his blood.
There is evidence that this plant had been brought to the Middle East before the time of Christ and the stems are flexible enough to weave into a circle,
He was being mocked for claiming that he was King of the Jews, so the soliders gave him a "crown." And to make it worse, they made it of thorns, so it was extremely painful.
The crown of thorns is an ancient concept, however it wasn’t until the Renaissance period that Christians paid more attention to the story and depicted Jesus as wearing it. The Bible itself doesn’t state how many thorny stems there were in the crown, but it is believed that they could have been anywhere from 9 to 30.







Categorised as a flowering plant in the spurge family, euphorbia is labelled as “poisonous” and a “skin and eye irritant” by the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS). In the Indian Journal of Ophthalmology, it says: “The milky sap or latex of Euphorbia plant is highly toxic and an irritant to the skin and eye.”

Ornamental pots tubs Gardens
Pesticide
The plant itself has proven to be an effective molluscicide and a natural alternative to pest control. The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended the usage of Euphorbia milii in aiding snail control. Especially in endemic countries. Schistosomiasis is an infectious disease from freshwater parasites, carried by snails. Extracts from the plant are used to control the snail population to avoid getting infected from a parasite.



The parts of the plant that grow above the ground are used to make medicine.
 Nepal the latex is used for treating strains , while in China it is used for the treatment of hepatitis and abdominal edema
breathing disorders including asthma, bronchitis, and chest congestion. It is also used for mucus in the nose and throat, throat spasms, hay fever, and tumors. Some people use it to cause vomiting.




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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #673 on: September 30, 2022, 10:57:56 AM »


HI

This plant is spectacular this plant is on the loop back road any time of the day touch the leaves they are cold

smoke-on-the-prairie

Euphorbia marginata
 Also known as whitemargined spurge, variegated spurge, snow-on-the-mountain is a small annual in the spurge family.
It is native to parts of temperate North America, from Eastern Canada to the Southwestern United States. It is naturalized throughout much of China and though Europe including UK, Zone: 2 to 11

Family:   Euphorbiaceae
Genus:   Euphorbia
Species:   E. marginata
Binomial name
Euphorbia marginata

Snow-on-the-mountain has grey-green leaves along branches and smaller leaves (bracts or cyathophylls) in terminal whorls with edges trimmed with wide white bands, creating, together with the white flowers, the appearance that gives the plant its common names.
Snow-on-the-mountain has also been found to emit large quantities of sulfur gas, mainly in the form of dimethyl sulfide (DMS)
This is a single-stemmed plant that typically grows to 1-3' tall. It is usually unbranched below the inflorescence. Leaves (1-3" long) are medium green in spring, with the upper leaves gradually developing showy clean white margins. Compound cymes of inconspicuous greenish-yellow true flowers bloom at the stem ends from mid-summer to early fall. Although the true flowers (borne in cyathia) lack sepals or petals and are not showy, these flowers are subtended by long-lasting, petal-like white bracts (modified leaves) that are showy. Flower bracts and variegated upper leaves provide the ornamental show there is no noticeable floral scent.. Plant sap is a milky juice that is toxic if ingested.

HABITAT
Sun: Full sun some shade afternoon in very hot countries Water: Dry to medium
Sandy, rocky limestone soils, pastures, disturbed areas; grasslands, areas along railroads and roadsides,  prairies. This plant has good tolerance to drought.








YES The sap contains a latex which is toxic on ingestion and highly irritant externally, causing photosensitive skin reactions and severe inflammation, especially on contact with eyes or open cuts. The toxicity can remain high even in dried plant material. Prolonged and regular contact with the sap is inadvisable because of its carcinogenic nature


A latex from the plant is used for chewing NOT RECOMMENDED. As a hedge  pots tubs gardens landscape parks and a Focal Point



Astringent, women's complaints. Used in the treatment of leucorrhoea. An infusion of the crushed leaves has been used as a liniment in the treatment of swellings. An infusion of the plant has been used to increase milk flow in nursing mothers. Any medicinal use of this plant should be carried out with great care NOT RECOMMENDED





Online kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #674 on: October 04, 2022, 11:51:00 AM »


                                   Sandflies on the island of Corfu, Greece



In Greece as a whole thirteen sand fly species, ten belonging to the medically important genus of Phlebotomus and three belonging to Sergentomyia are known; five of these are proven or suspected vectors of L. infantum (P. perfiliewi, P. tobbi and P.

The island of Corfu is an endemic area of human leishmaniasis, mainly visceral and secondly cutaneous. In August 1996, a survey of phlebotomine sandflies was conducted throughout the whole island. Using castor-oil paper traps, a total of 2,615 sandflies were caught. The following species were identified: 450 (17.21 %) Phlebotomus neglectus, 213 (8.15%) P. tobbi, 129 (4.93%) P. Perfiliewi, 12 (0.46%) P.sergenti, 11 (0.42%) P.simici, 4 (0.15%) P. papatasi, 999 (38.20%) Sergentomyia minuta and 797 (30.48%)S. dentata. Among the potential vectors of Leishmania spp., P. neglectus, P. tobbi and P. perfiliewi, were the most widespread species on the island. However, a decrease of the population density of sandflies compared to previous entomological studies was observed.

Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease that is found in parts of the tropics, subtropics, and southern Europe. It is classified as a neglected tropical disease (NTD). Leishmaniasis is caused by infection with Leishmania parasites, which are spread by the bite of phlebotomine sand flies.

Are gnats the same as sand flies?
Simply put, sand flies are small bloodsucking gnats, usually no bigger than ⅛ inch long
Biting midges in this family are commonly called punkies, no-see-ums, sand gnats and flying teeth. They are grayish in color, but after taking a blood meal are likely to be reddish in appearance. They are only about 1/25- 1/8 inch long and are vicious biters, biting any area of the body that is exposed.
Biting gnats, also called sand gnats or no-see-ums, are in fact biting midges. These midges (Family: Ceratopogonidae) are most prevalent near sources of water such as swamps, marshes, ponds, and the edges of streams. The mud around these moist areas is where the females lay eggs and the larvae develop.

Prevention

 The bites usually result in a small, intensely itchy bump or welt, the strength of which intensifies over a period of 5-7 days before dissipating. Moderate relief is achieved with varying success through the application of over the counter products such as Benadryl (ingested) or an analgesic cream such as After Bite
Over-the-counter repellents with high concentrations of DEET or picaridin are proven to work, but may not be suitable for some people, e.g. people with sensitive skin and pregnant women. However, the effectiveness of DEET and picaridin products seems to differ among individuals with some people reporting better results with one product over another while other people finding neither product effective for them. This may be partially due to various species living in different areas.

A particular extract of lemon eucalyptus oil (not the essential oil) has now been shown to be as effective as DEET in various studies.

Most information on repellents focuses on mosquitoes, but mosquito repellents are effective for sandflies and midges as well.
If you prefer a natural approach you can apply everything from lemon juice, eucalyptus spray and meths' to Vegemite, coconut oil and (presumably because it works on vampires) garlic. If you are happy to use a chemical based repellent, go for one with DEET as the active ingredient.







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