Author Topic: Walking around corfu  (Read 276039 times)

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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #630 on: June 09, 2022, 04:52:52 PM »


Hi
My grandson as most of you know Billy got me these from Spain last week
I am going to give it a go






Kev



Offline Eggy

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #631 on: June 09, 2022, 07:20:57 PM »
Kevin
If they start to grow I have no doubt that you will be in the garden, every evening, fruit squeezing to check if they are ripe.
Negg

Offline Truth

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #632 on: June 09, 2022, 10:10:08 PM »
😂😂
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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #633 on: June 10, 2022, 04:13:08 PM »


Hi
Just planted the seeds when the first bud appears 🍆 I will prick out and give a lot of tender loving care  🥰

Kev

Offline Eggy

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #634 on: June 10, 2022, 06:15:27 PM »


Hi
Just planted the seeds when the first bud appears 🍆 I will prick and give tender loving  🥰

Kev


Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #635 on: June 11, 2022, 11:25:51 AM »


HI
If you go into the sea around Arillas not to far out you can see this plant small clumps. And on the beach can see the fruits

The Ionian Environment Foundation supported iSea in the critical task of mapping the Posidonia Meadows around the threatened region of the Erimitis peninsular. This area projects into a narrow body of water between the coasts of Albania and Greece (Northeast Corfu), that separates the two countries. The channel is a passage from the Adriatic Sea to the north to the Ionian Sea.


Mediterranean tapeweed

Posidonia oceanica

Commonly known as Neptune grass or Mediterranean tapeweed, is a seagrass species that is endemic to the Mediterranean Sea. It forms large underwater meadows that are an important part of the ecosystem. The fruit is free floating and known in Italy as "the olive of the sea" (l'oliva di mare). Balls of fibrous material from its foliage, known as egagropili or Neptune balls, wash up to nearby shorelines.

The Posidonia has a very high carbon absorption capacity, being able to soak up 15 times more carbon dioxide every year than a similar sized piece of the Amazon rainforest.

Family:   Posidoniaceae
Genus:   Posidonia
Species:   P. oceanica
Binomial name
Posidonia oceanica

Posidonia oceanica is a flowering plant which lives in dense meadows or along channels in the sands of the Mediterranean. It is found at depths from 1–35 metres (3.3–114.8 ft), according to water clarity. Subsurface rhizomes and roots stabilize the plant while erect rhizomes and leaves reduce silt accumulation.
The leaves are ribbon-like, appearing in tufts of 6 or 7, and up to 1.5 metres (4.9 ft) long.[citation needed] Average leaf width is around 10 millimetres (0.39 in). The leaves are bright green, perhaps turning brown with age, and have 13 to 17 parallel veins. The leaf terminus is rounded or sometimes absent because of damage. Leaves are arranged in groups, with older leaves on the outside, longer and differing in form from the younger leaves they surround.

The rhizome type stems are found in two forms: one growing up to 150 centimetres (59 in) beneath the sand and the other rising above the sand. All stems are approximately 10 millimetres (0.39 in) thick and upright in habit. This arrangement of the rhizomes eventually forms a mat; the surface contains the active parts of the plant, whereas the center is a dense network of roots and decomposing stems.
In 2006 a huge clonal colony of P. oceanica was discovered south of the island of Ibiza and stretches as far south as La Savina and Es Pujols on the island of Formentera. At 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) across, and estimated at around 100,000 years old,[9] it may be one of the largest and oldest clonal colonies on Earth.

Dead rhizomes with olive-mill waste are used for compost.
Seagrass forms so-called 'Neptune balls' - oval orbs made from the base of leaves that have been shredded and intertwine into a ball. These Neptune balls collect plastic as they form, before carrying the rubbish to shore.

The endemic species Posidonia oceanica is the most important seagrass in the Mediterranean Sea
The role of Posidonia meadows in marine coastal environments is often correctly compared to that of the forest in terrestrial environments.

On Corfu, information about the spatial extent of the seagrass meadows is poor with only two areas having been mapped: between Othonoi island and Mathraki and from Perama to Ag. Ioannis and sall clumps around the coastline

The main threat to these meadows is habitat degradation by the following human activities:

water pollution, construction of coastal infrastructure, modification of marine currents, fishing, invasive species and shipping;

Critically, research is needed in order to assess the situation and build data on this mostly understudied area.

Distribution and habitat
This species is found only in the Mediterranean Sea, where it is in decline, occupying an area of about 3% of the basin. This corresponds to a surface area of about 38,000 square kilometres (15,000 sq mi). Posidonia grows best in clean waters, and its presence is a marker for lack of pollution. The presence of Posidonia can be detected by the masses of decomposing leaves on beaches. Such plant material has been used for composting, but Italian laws prohibit the use of marine algae and plants for this purpose.
 they are the only flowering plants that can live underwater. More closely related to lilies and gingers than to true grasses, they grow in sediment on the sea floor with erect, elongate leaves and a buried root-like structure (rhizome)









Some of them swim in from deeper waters at high tide and we don't see them now at low tide. "Can Eat or Not?" While we can't eat seagrasses, the fruits of the Tape seagrass is edible and is eaten by native people in Australia.


In some places, seagrasses are made into useful objects such as rugs and even roofing.
Seagrasses have been used by humans for over 10,000 years. They've been used to fertilize fields, insulate houses, weave furniture, thatch roofs, make bandages, and fill mattresses and even car seats. But it's what they do in their native habitat that has the biggest benefits for humans and the ocean.
 Tape Seagrass. Actually one does not eat the Tape Seagrass but rather its large seeds, which taste like chestnuts when cooked.


In folk medicine, seagrasses have been used for a variety of remedial purposes, e.g. for the treatment of fever and skin diseases, muscle pains, wounds, stomach problems, a remedy against stings of different kinds of rays and tranquillizers for babies
Seagrass as a potential source of natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents
Context: Halophila spp. is a strong medicine against malaria and skin diseases and is found to be very effective in early stages of leprosy. Seagrasses are nutraceutical in nature and therefore of importance as food supplements.
seagrasses uptake high concentrations of potassium, magnesium, calcium, iron and sodium, which take part in the physiological processes of aquatic plants. The uptake of these nutrients is influenced by the nutrient concentrations in the sediments and dissolved nutrients in the seawater.



Offline Billy M

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #636 on: June 12, 2022, 09:29:15 AM »


Grandad how you going to cut the grass would you use your new petrol mower or your old electric hover
You can get Neil who lives in Arillas to do the strimming

Billy m

Offline Truth

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #637 on: June 12, 2022, 11:10:31 AM »
Scissors Billy 😁
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Offline Eggy

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #638 on: June 12, 2022, 12:44:13 PM »
I luv running around with an electric strimmer! - and sometimes I plug it in!
Negg

Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #639 on: June 13, 2022, 08:33:28 AM »


HI

kev

Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #640 on: June 15, 2022, 08:57:35 AM »


HI

In my last information post about Posidonia oceanica seagrass you do not have to go far just the end of the jetty a photo i took 2017

  kev

Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #641 on: June 28, 2022, 11:50:46 AM »


HI

You start to see this fruit around Arillas and around Corfu

Peach

Prunus persica
 
Is a deciduous tree first domesticated and cultivated in Zhejiang province of Eastern China. It bears edible juicy fruits with various characteristics, most called peaches and others (the glossy-skinned, non-fuzzy varieties), nectarines.
The specific name persica refers to its widespread cultivation in Persia (modern-day Iran), from where it was transplanted to Europe. It belongs to the genus Prunus, which includes the cherry, apricot, almond, and plum, in the rose family. The peach is classified with the almond in the subgenus Amygdalus, distinguished from the other subgenera by the corrugated seed shell (endocarp). Due to their close relatedness, the kernel of a peach stone tastes remarkably similar to almond, and peach stones are often used to make a cheap version of marzipan, known as persipan
Peaches and nectarines are the same species  though they are regarded commercially as different fruits. The skin of nectarines lacks the fuzz (fruit-skin trichomes) that peach skin has; a mutation in a single gene  is thought to be responsible for the difference between the two.

Family:   Rosaceae
Genus:   Prunus
Subgenus:   Prunus subg. Amygdalus
Species:   P. persica
Binomial name
Prunus persica

Prunus persica grows up to 7 m (23 ft) tall and wide, but when pruned properly, trees are usually 3–4 m tall and wide
The leaves are lanceolate, 7–16 cm (3–6+1⁄2 in) long, 2–3 cm (3⁄4–1+1⁄4 in) broad, and pinnately veined. The flowers are produced in early spring before the leaves; they are solitary or paired, 2.5–3 cm diameter, pink, with five petals. The fruit has yellow or whitish flesh, a delicate aroma, and a skin that is either velvety (peaches) or smooth (nectarines) in different cultivars. The flesh is very delicate and easily bruised in some cultivars, but is fairly firm in some commercial varieties, especially when green. The single, large seed is red-brown, oval shaped, around 1.3–2 cm long, and surrounded by a wood-like husk. Peaches, along with cherries, plums, and apricots, are stone fruits (drupes). The various heirloom varieties including the 'Indian Peach', or 'Indian Blood Peach', which ripens in the latter part of the summer, and can have color ranging from red and white, to purple Cultivated peaches are divided into clingstones and freestones, depending on whether the flesh sticks to the stone or not; both can have either white or yellow flesh. Peaches with white flesh typically are very sweet with little acidity, while yellow-fleshed peaches typically have an acidic tang coupled with sweetness, though this also varies greatly. Both colors often have some red on their skins. Low-acid, white-fleshed peaches are the most popular kinds in China, Japan, and neighbouring Asian countries, while Europeans and North Americans have historically favoured the acidic, yellow-fleshed cultivars.

HABITAT
Peaches generally grow best in well drained sandy loams, but can be found in thickets, roadsides, and other disturbed habitats.
Peaches thrive in a limited range of dry continental or temperate climates. Most of the peach cultivars need 500 hours of chilling climate between 0 to 10 degrees Celsius when important chemical reactions take place even though the plant might appear dormant. After the chilling period, the plant enters quiescence which is the second type of dormancy. The plant requires warm weather so that buds can grow and break. The trees can thrive in temperatures between -26 to -30 degrees Celsius however the buds become less cold tolerant during late winter. Eventually, the summer heat is required for a peach plant to mature which then begins to bear fruits in their third year of cultivation. The plant can have a lifespan of between 7 and 15 years.

The world's largest peach producer is China, followed by Spain, Italy, Greece, and the United States.

HISTORY
The peach probably originated in China and then spread westward through Asia to the Mediterranean countries and later to other parts of Europe. The Spanish explorers took the peach to the New World, and as early as 1600 the fruit was found in Mexico. For centuries the cultivation and selection of new varieties of peaches were largely confined to the gardens of the nobility, and large-scale commercial peach growing did not begin until the 19th century, in the United States. The early plantings were seedling peaches, inevitably variable, and often of poor quality. The practice of grafting superior strains onto hardy seedling rootstocks, which came later in the century, led to the development of large commercial orchards.
 More recent evidence indicates that domestication occurred as early as 6000 BC in Zhejiang Province of China. The oldest archaeological peach stones are from the Kuahuqiao site near Hangzhou. Archaeologists point to the Yangtze River Valley as the place where the early selection for favorable peach varieties probably took place. Peaches were mentioned in Chinese writings and literature beginning from the early first millennium BC.

Peacherines  are claimed to be a cross between a peach and a nectarine, but as they are the same species cannot be a true cross (hybrid); they are marketed in Australia and New Zealand. The fruit is intermediate in appearance, though, between a peach and a nectarine, large and brightly colored like a red peach. The flesh of the fruit is usually yellow, but white varieties also exist. The Koanga Institute lists varieties that ripen in the Southern Hemisphere in February and March.
In 1909, Pacific Monthly mentioned peacherines in a news bulletin for California. Louise Pound, in 1920, claimed the term peacherine is an example of language stunt.







Some fresh fruits, including cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines and apricots have pits that contains cyanide compounds, which are poisonous. If a couple pits are accidentally swallowed, it will not cause poisoning. The pits are more poisonous if they are ground up/crushed or the seeds are chewed.

The pit is the part of the fruit that protects the seed until such time when it can start to grow. It is the inner layer of a fruit's (some fruits) pericarp that's usually hard. However, only certain fruits have a pit.



In gardens Parks landscape
Peach wood infuses a sweet, fruity flavor that's similar to other fruit wood. Peach wood is great when grilling pork, poultry and small game birds. Pear is similar to peach wood. It smokes a light sweet and fruity flavor that works great with pork, poultry and small game birds.
Make Peach Juice
 The peach tree (Prunus persica) use for furniture wood



The bark is demulcent, diuretic, expectorant and sedative. It is used internally in the treatment of gastritis, whooping cough, coughs and bronchitis. The root bark is used in the treatment of dropsy and jaundice. The bark is harvested from young trees in the spring and is dried for later use.

Peaches may have protective effects that help keep your skin healthy. Test-tube studies indicate that compounds found in peaches may improve your skin's ability to retain moisture — thus improving skin texture

Can we rub peach on face?
A great source of Vitamin C, peach helps to remove dark circles and blemishes. Its macronutrients also help in removing wrinkles and hence, peach is a common ingredient in anti-ageing face masks. It tightens the skin's pores and does wonders for a tired skin.

Contributing to fiber intake

Topping up potassium intake

Iron supplementation

Nutrients and Antioxidants

Peaches may contribute to healthy digestion.

Peaches may lower risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and cholesterol levels

Like most fruits, peaches provide beneficial plant compounds that may offer some protection against various cancers.
Specifically, peach skin and flesh are rich in carotenoids and caffeic acid — two types of antioxidants found to have anticancer properties

Peaches may reduce allergy symptoms.

Studies show that compounds found in peaches may help prevent high blood sugar levels and
insulin resistance in obese rats

They can be eaten raw, baked, grilled, broiled, or sautéed and are easily incorporated into warm or cold dishes alike.

For instance, fresh peaches make a great nutrient-rich snack and can be eaten either on their own or topped with yogurt and a handful of nuts.

Peaches can be added to salads or stirred into a hearty chickpea curry. They add an unexpected touch to salsa and are also a popular ingredient in many desserts.

Lastly, peaches can be blended into a smoothie or gently mashed to add flavor to your water.










Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #642 on: July 08, 2022, 10:16:43 AM »

HI



Apricot

Prunus armeniaca  is the most commonly cultivated apricot species. The native range is somewhat uncertain due to its extensive prehistoric cultivation. Genetic studies indicate Central Asia is the center of origin. It is extensively cultivated in many countries and has escaped into the wild in many places.
Usually, an apricot is from the species P. armeniaca, but the fruits of the other species in Prunus sect. Armeniaca are also called apricots.
The specific epithet armeniaca refers to the country of Armenia in western Asia.
What fruit is native to Greece?
Apricots, peaches, nectarines, and cherries are also delicious and highly nutritious fruits you can find in Greece. Late August and early September is the season of two other fruits: figs and grapes. Fig trees are very common in Greece and the islands, you will see many such trees on the side of the roads.

Family:   Rosaceae
Genus:   Prunus
Subgenus:   Prunus subg. Prunus
Section:   Prunus sect. Armeniaca
Species:   P. armeniaca
Binomial name
Prunus armeniaca
L.
Synonyms
Amygdalus armeniaca (L.) Dumort.
Armeniaca ansu (Maxim.) Kostina
Armeniaca vulgaris Lam.
Prunus ansu (Maxim.) Kom.
Armeniaca holosericea (Batalin) Kostina
Armeniaca armeniaca (L.) Huth
Prunus tiliifolia Salisb.
Prunus xanthocarpos Hort. ex C.Koch

Prunus armeniaca is a small tree, 8–12 m  tall, with a trunk up to 40 cm  in diameter and a dense, spreading canopy. The leaves are ovate, 5–9 cm long and 4–8 cm  wide, with a rounded base, a pointed tip and a finely serrated margin. The flowers are 2–4.5 cm in diameter, with five white to pinkish petals; they are produced singly or in pairs in early spring before the leaves. The fruit is a drupe similar to a small peach, 1.5–2.5 cm diameter (larger in some modern cultivars), from yellow to orange, often tinged red on the side most exposed to the sun; its surface can be smooth (botanically described as: glabrous) or velvety with very short hairs (botanically: pubescent). The flesh (mesocarp) is succulent and its taste can range from sweet to tart. The single seed is enclosed in a hard, stony shell, often called a "stone", with a grainy, smooth texture except for three ridges running down one side

HABITAT
hardiness zones five through nine. They thrive in climates where winters are cold enough to induce a dormancy period and summers are warm but not sweltering hot. Choose a sunny location with enough room for the tree to grow.
 It is in flower from March to April, and the seeds ripen from July to September.
Woodland Garden Secondary; Sunny Edge; Dappled Shade; South Wall. West Wall.

Apricot trees are well known for their delicious fruit and are cultivated worldwide. However their wild ancestor, Armeniaca vulgaris, is now rare and in danger of extinction.

The wild apricot is a small tree between 5 and 8m in height with a greyish brown bark. The flowers can be white, pink or tinged with red and the fruit is yellow to orange often tinged with red on the side most exposed to the sun.

The long history of cultivation makes it difficult to know for certain whether specific populations are really wild or escaped from cultivation. However, the species probably originated in Central Asia and can be found in China, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan. In their natural environment the wild apricot grows in sparse forests on mountain slopes and gullies between 700 and 3000m.

HISTORY
The apricot was known in Armenia during ancient times, and has been cultivated there for so long that it was previously thought to have originated there.
An archaeological excavation at Garni in Armenia found apricot seeds in a Chalcolithic-era site. Its scientific name Prunus armeniaca (Armenian plum) derives from that assumption. For example, Belgian arborist Baron de Poerderlé, writing in the 1770s, asserted, "Cet arbre tire son nom de l'Arménie, province d'Asie, d'où il est originaire et d'où il fut porté en Europe ..." ("this tree takes its name from Armenia, province of Asia, where it is native, and whence it was brought to Europe ...") A large variety of apricots, around 50, are grown in Armenia today.
Apricots have been cultivated in China since no later than 1000 BC. Beginning in about the seventh century, apricots in China have been preserved by various methods, including salting and smoking, and the more common drying. Hubei is noted for its black smoked apricots.
Its introduction to Greece is attributed to Alexander the Great.
In England during the 17th century, apricot oil was used in herbalism treatments intended to act against tumors, swelling, and ulcers.
In the 17th century, English settlers brought the apricot to the English colonies in the New World. Most of modern American production of apricots comes from the seedlings carried to the West Coast by Spanish missionaries. Almost all U.S. commercial production is in California, with some in Washington and Utah.
Apricots drying on the ground in Turkey
Today, apricot cultivation has spread to all parts of the globe having climates that can support its growth needs.

The name apricot derives from the Arabic al-birquq through Byzantine Greek berikokkia from Latin malum praecoquum – early ripening fruit. The Latin Prunus armeniacum is a reference to an early believed origin in Armenia, which is one of the places where these trees are wild.

APRICOT PRODUCTION IN GREECE
Apricot production varies from year to year because of weather conditions but usually it lies between 60.000 and 80.000 tons/year. The industry in recent years has been reduced, even though the prices succeeded by the farmers at the market are considered very good, because of Sharka disease.
The apricot industry is located in a small area of Peloponnesos (Southern Greece) and in the peninsula of Halkidiki (Makedonia- Greece). The main cultivars used are the greek ones Bebecou (95%) and Tirynthos (5%). Both are very susceptible to sharka and therefore, besides the big scale of tree losses that have been noticed, very small acreage is planted with apricot trees. The most common rootstock used is the apricot seedling.
Apricot culture in Greece goes back to the ancient times; it was well known before the coming of the peach. The apricot fruit, fresh or canned, is very popular in Greece.










NONE
 Apricot kernels contain the plant toxin amygdalin, which converts to cyanide after eating. Cyanide poisoning can cause nausea, fever, headaches, insomnia, thirst, lethargy, nervousness, joint and muscle aches and pains, and falling blood pressure. In extreme cases, it is fatal.
 brick red mucous membranes, dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, panting, shock.


Landscape parks gardens  fruit juice yogurt wine jam cooking apricot oil is used in cosmetics.



The fruit and fruit juice are used as medicine. Apricot is used for asthma, constipation, infertility, vaginal infections, and other conditions,

Good Source of Vitamin A

Apricots are packed with Vitamin A, which is also known as retinol. It's fat soluble, and helps in the enhancement of vision, among other things. And it keeps the immune system in check, protecting your skin in the process. Retinol and Beta Carotene (also present in apricots) also reduces the chances of you developing a serious eye-related disorder called Neovascular ARMD – an age-related macular degeneration that causes loss of vision over the years.

Rich in Fiber

Whether you eat it dried, or fresh, apricots are a good source of dietary fiber. Given that the retinol in apricot is fat soluble, the fruit dissolves in the body easily, and the important nutrients are easily absorbed by the system. And it breaks down fatty acids fast, which means your digestion is in order. And not only that, the fruit protects you from gastrointestinal concerns by cleaning out the intestines regularly.

Good for Your Heart

Given that the fruit is high on fiber content, it helps to reduce the bad cholesterol content in the body, and that means your heart is protected. And at the same time, it increases the good cholesterol. Plus the potassium content in the fruit balances the electrolyte levels in our system, keeping our heart muscles in order. All you have to do is eat one or two fresh apricots every day, or a handful of dried ones.

 Antioxidants

Ripe apricots are natural sources of antioxidants. When consumed daily, it helps the body to get rid of toxins that we tend to collect over time. Antioxidants in turn also kill free radicals that damage our cells.

 Good for Your Blood

Any plant produce that contains iron has non-heme iron, and that includes apricot. This type of iron takes its time to be absorbed by the body, and the longer it stays in the system, the better your chances in preventing anemia. It's recommended that you take some vitamin C along with it to ensure better absorption of the non-heme iron.

Good for the Skin

The combination of Vitamin C, A, and phytonutrients ensures good skin. And did you know that the antioxidants in the apricot also slow the ageing process? So apart from a good skin care regime, don't forget to eat some apricots every day

It Strengthens Your Bones

Calcium is much required in the formation and development of bones, and apricot has lots of it. What's also interesting to note that without enough potassium in the body, the calcium is not absorbed and disposed of uniformly. And the good news is that the apricot has both of them!

Apricots Boost Digestive Health

Can Aid Diabetes Treatment

Apricots are quite low in calories and carbs (one fruit contains just 17 calories and 4 grams of carbs) – and this is good news for diabetics. They can very well be a part of a diabetes diet. And the fiber they contain can regulate blood sugar levels.

Improve Vision

Regular fruit intake has been linked to a reduced risk of vision loss. But more importantly, apricots are rich in carotenoids and xanthophylls – nutrients that researchers believe can prevent age-related vision ailments. And they also contain vitamin A, another important nutrient for the eyes. Also called retinol, it prevents age-related macular degeneration.
As per studies, topical application of apricot kernel extract can reduce dry eyes by stimulating tear production

Apricots Prevent Liver Damage

Can Treat Earache

Treat Respiratory Ailments

Treats Scalp Issues





Offline Eggy

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #643 on: July 08, 2022, 10:57:38 AM »
Kevin
We have just picked the last ones here. Probably around 10kg of Apricots over the last 2/3 weeks.
We gave away quite a bit and Wegg has frozen some.

Cheers
Negg

Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #644 on: July 08, 2022, 02:45:01 PM »


Hi Neil

Why don’t you well not you Wendy make Apricot jam


1.2kg apricot, fresh, halved and pitted
1.2kg white cane sugar, granulated
1 lemon, juiced

Layer the apricots and sugar in a large preserving pan, add the juice of the lemon and leave overnight

2 When you are ready to make the jam, place two or three saucers into the freezer beforehand - to check the set

3. Place the pan over a low to medium heat, and allow the sugar to dissolve slowly. As soon as the sugar has dissolved, turn the heat up and bring the jam to a rolling boil. Allow to boil for about 10-15 minutes, stirring it every now and then, until a set has been reached

4. After about 5 minutes, check for a set. Take one of the cold saucers out of the freezer, take the jam off the heat and place a teaspoon of the jam on the saucer. Allow it to cool for a few seconds then push it with your finger: if a crinkly skin has formed on the jam, then it has set. If it hasn't set, boil it again for another 5 minutes and do another test

5  When you have a set, remove the preserve from the heat and allow it to settle for 5 minutes. Stir the jam and spoon off any scum before pouring it into the warmed sterilised jars. Seal while still warm and label the jars when cold


 

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