Author Topic: Walking around corfu  (Read 268943 times)

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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #600 on: January 11, 2022, 10:29:35 AM »

HI
Over the years he have visited a fair few Greek islands. We visited a small island the only to Kalymnos was by ferry from Kos.
We stayed at Anna Studios Melitsahas beach. As we all we got to know the family in the 1990s. Anna had two sons one daughter called Poppy age about 17-19. As the Greeks do build a house for the daughter well in this case a big house and a big
three tier garden  then levels out with a four foot brick wall all around the house.
The family approach me one evening a asked me if i could do a garden plan for Poppys house.
Well i was shocked as i have only design uk gardens this job is a big challenge and yes of course i will.
Anna and Poppy took me to the house up in the hills. i took measurements and photos.
Over the next year i was Emailing to find out the plats they would like and most Greeks have a pergola in the garden so they can grow vines up and sit out in the evening to eat or just have a few drinks.
We went out the following year with the plans i was very nervous but i gained experience.
The day after we got there i showed them the plans we all sat around a table with cold drinks and talked and there was a few tweaks it was plants the Oleander Plants they called them graveyard plants for the dead so we came up with some new plants
and yes the plans passed all ok
What a relief that called for anther drink or two
Anna said they will start in the next few weeks  after we went back home they Knew someone with a JCB to do the groundwork
and the planting

I have no photos of the finished project yesterday i found some old pics








Offline Truth

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #601 on: January 11, 2022, 09:37:58 PM »
Kalymnos is a lovely island Kev! We went over on the ferry from Kos for a day. Friends of ours got stranded there as the sea turned vicious and a bar owner let them sleep in his Taverna all night for free ....... actually in the bar area 🤣
Only in Greece eh....... 😉
Wolverhampton Wanderers, pride of The Midlands......

Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #602 on: January 12, 2022, 10:56:09 AM »


HI

You most probably see this plant on your travels in Greek gardens in spring time


Saucer Magnolia

Magnolia × soulangeana  (Magnolia denudata × Magnolia liliiflora) Also known as a Tulip, Saucer or Chinese Magnolia,  is a hybrid flowering plant in the genus Magnolia and family Magnoliaceae.
 Being widely planted in the British Isles, especially in the south of England; and in the United States, and  other parts of Europe, Spain, Greece, Italy,  east and southeast Asia
It is a deciduous tree with large, early-blooming flowers in various shades of white, pink, and purple. It is one of the most commonly used magnolias in horticulture, being widely planted
Growing as a multistemmed large shrub or small tree, Magnolia × soulangeana has alternate, simple, shiny, dark green oval-shaped leaves on stout stems. Its flowers emerge dramatically on a bare tree in early spring, with the deciduous leaves expanding shortly thereafter, lasting through summer until autumn.

Family:   Magnoliaceae
Genus:   Magnolia
Species:   M. × soulangeana
Binomial name
Magnolia × soulangeana

Magnolia × soulangeana flowers are large, commonly 10–20 cm (4–8 in) across, and colored various shades of white, pink, and maroon. An American variety, 'Grace McDade' from Alabama, is reported to bear the largest flowers, with a 35 cm (14 in) diameter, white tinged with pinkish-purple.
 Another variety, Magnolia × soulangeana 'Jurmag1', is supposed to have the darkest and tightest flowers. The exact timing and length of flowering varies between named varieties, as does the shape of the flower. Some are globular, others a cup-and-saucer shape.
 There are more than 200 species of Magnolia native to temperate, subtropical and tropical areas of southeastern Asia, eastern North America, Central America, the Caribbean and parts of South America. and europe, Many are now grown worldwide because of their beautiful flowers, shape and form.

HABITAT
 it will grow in partial or full sunlight. Though evergreen, leaf drop may occur in the cooler end of its range. Southern magnolia should be planted in a protected location, as strong winds can damage its lustrous 4-inch leaves.
Magnolias grow best in fertile, well-drained, slightly acidic soil in full sun. Choose a sheltered spot that is not in a low-lying frost pocket – frost can damage the flowers. If you live in a cold part of the country, choose a variety that flowers later.
                                                      parent plants
Magnolia denudata  is a rather low, rounded, thickly branched, and coarse-textured tree to 30 feet (9.1 m) tall. The leaves are ovate, bright green, 15 cm long and 8 cm wide. The bark is a coarse, dark gray. The 10–16 cm white flowers that emerge from early to late spring, while beautiful and thick with a citrus-lemon fragrance, are prone to browning if subjected to frost.

Magnolia liliiflora It is a deciduous shrub, exceptionally a small tree, to 4m tall (smaller than most other magnolias), and blooms profusely in early spring with large pink to purple showy flowers, before the leaf buds open.

                                                = Magnolia × soulangeana

HISTORY

Magnolia × soulangeana was initially bred by French plantsman Étienne Soulange-Bodin (1774–1846), a retired cavalry officer in Napoleon's army, at his château de Fromont near Paris. He crossed Magnolia denudata with M. liliiflora in 1820, and was impressed with the resulting progeny's first precocious flowering in 1826.
Many times, Soulange-Bodin is cited as the author of this hybrid name, rarely with a reference to a publication however. If a source is given, it is often an English translation of a French title (see for example Callaway, D.J. (1994), World of Magnolias: 204). Soulange-Bodin certainly did not name the hybrid after himself. The name was proposed by members of the Société Linnéenne de Paris and published by Arsène Thiébaud de Berneaud, the secretary of the society, in Relation de la cinquième fête champêtre célébré le 24 mai 1826 in: Comte-Rendu des Travaux de la Société Linnéenne de Paris 1826:
From France, the hybrid quickly entered cultivation in England and other parts of Europe, and also North America. Since then, plant breeders in many countries have continued to develop this plant, and over a hundred named horticultural varieties (cultivars) are now known.

Magnolia × soulangeana is notable for its ease of cultivation, and its relative tolerance to wind and alkaline soils (two vulnerabilities of many other magnolias).

Magnolias are however one of the most primitive plants in evolutionary history and fossil records show that magnolias once existed in Europe, North America and Asia over 100 million years ago.

Magnolia soulangeana forms a rounded, spreading shrub or tree suitable for a small garden. Expect a height and spread of 6 x 4 metres in 20 years.








     



NONE

Gardens Parks Street tree Landscape ornamental tree The flowers of Magnolia trees are edible and medicinal. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, Magnolia flowers are known as Xin yi hua and are associated with the lung and stomach meridians.  eating them fresh they taste fragrant and spicy.
 the large logs can be of use for manufacturing machines for cabinet or millwork. Or the wood has also been used for making paper.



People use the bark and flower buds to make medicine. Magnolia is used for weight loss, problems with digestion, constipation, inflammation, anxiety, stress, depression, fever, headache, stroke, and asthma.
Anxiety Treatment
Honokiol has certain anxiolytic qualities that directly impact the hormonal balance in the body, particularly in terms of stress hormones. By regulating the endocrine system, magnolia might help reduce anxiety and stress by soothing the mind and lowering hormone release in the body. A similar chemical pathway allows it to help relieve depression as well, by stimulating the release of dopamine and pleasure hormones that can help turn your mood around

Reduces Gingivitis
A study published in the International Journal of Dental Hygiene showed that magnolia extract helped reduce gingivitis, in which gums become inflamed and bleed easily.

Respiratory Issues
Magnolia has long been used to relieve certain respiratory conditions, including bronchitis, coughing, excess phlegm, and even asthma. It naturally stimulates the corticosteroids in the body to respond to conditions like asthma, thereby relieving inflammation and preventing asthmatic attacks, according to studies on Chinese traditional medicines.

Menstrual Cramps
The volatile components found in magnolia flowers and bark are also considered soothing or relaxing agents, reducing inflammation and muscle tension when consumed. Herbal practitioners would prescribe magnolia flower buds to ease the menstrual cramp. When it comes to menstrual discomfort, its supplements are often recommended, as they may provide relief, as well as improve mood and prevent the emotional peaks and valleys associated with the pre-menstrual period

Anti-allergenic
In a similar vein to magnolia’s effects against asthma, the steroid-mimicking properties of its extracts help prevent allergic reactions in those who regularly suffer from these symptoms. If you have hay fever, seasonal allergies, or specific allergen sensitivity, magnolia supplements can help strengthen your resistance and keep you feeling your best!


Although magnolia bark can actually increase weight by stimulating food cravings due to its corticosteroid nature, magnolia supplements may help suppress appetite, which can help anyone trying to lose weight. A clinical study involving healthy premenopausal women showed that a combination of Magnolia Officinalis and Phellodendron amurense extracts helped aid weight loss in the participants. However, further studies are needed to explore this health benefit. So, be sure you speak to a professional herbalist or alternative medical professional to get the best advice on what kind of supplement would best serve your needs.

Anticancer Potential
According to a study conducted by Lin S. et al, magnolol, a compound found in Magnolia Officinalis, might prove useful in restricting the proliferation of cancer cells. Another compound present in this flora, honokiol, is also looked at as an anticancer agent. A 2012 research published in the Current Molecular Medicine journal has encouraged clinical trials to explore the potential of this compound as a natural, novel anticancer agent

Manages Diabetes
One of the reasons that magnolia has gotten so much press in recent years is its bark’s active compounds’ ability to mimic cortisol, the stress-hormone reducing factor in our body. By acting as cortisol, it has the potential to help the body control its release and management of blood sugar. This could go a long way toward preventing the development of diabetes.

Improves Liver Health
Along with stimulating the lymphatic system and increasing the level of toxins being eliminated from the body, magnolia has also been linked to reducing the build-up of fat around the liver, one of the primary causes of liver failure following excessive alcohol consumption, also called ALD (Alcohol Liver Disease). Researchers have shown it to be a promising remedy for this widespread problem for people who drink excessively and want to retain a high quality of life as they age

Alzheimer’s Disease
For people suffering from Alzheimer’s disease or showing risks of other cognitive disorders, magnolia may be a powerful strategy to increase cognition. The magnolol found in it stimulates acetylcholine levels in the brain, which is what amyloid plaque in the brain can reduce. Honokiol present in magnolia is also linked to increased brain function and neural activity, thereby reducing memory loss and increasing cognition.


Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #603 on: January 14, 2022, 05:51:24 PM »


Hi Truth
The same thing happened to a group staying near us at the time they had to get a much later ferry
I must tell you this story
Up the road on the main drag there was a bar showing all football I can not remember if it was Euros or World Cup qualifying
We was playing Germany we was all in England tops a few good supporters in the bar at the time
Just before the mach started a load of Germans sat down with drinks  and chanting at us England sh&t we was ready for it to go off
Well it didn’t
When we started to put the bull in the net they started to leave end score 5 - 1 what a fu#£*£g win the best it was better then being at Wembley to see the Germans go never estimate the English haha


Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #604 on: January 17, 2022, 09:52:30 AM »


HI
If you are walking around Kassiopi in some of the gardens close to the building you may see this plant

Bird of Paradise

Strelitzia reginae Also known as  crane flower,bird of paradise, isigude in Nguni  Nguni languages are a group of Bantu languages spoken in southern Africa by the Nguni peoples. is native to the southern and eastern parts of the Cape Province and northern Natal in South Africa.  ​is a species of flowering plant indigenous to South Africa. An evergreen perennial, it is widely cultivated for its dramatic flowers. In temperate areas it is a popular houseplant.
As the world is getting warmer people are experimenting with plants and have a plant that stands out from your neighbour
 1.5m, forming a clump of long-stalked, oblong, grey-green leaves; orange and blue flowers emerge in succession from a beak-like spathe
Family:   Strelitziaceae
Genus:   Strelitzia
Species:   S. reginae
Binomial name
Strelitzia reginae

HABITAT
 They will thrive in rich loamy soil, especially when they get plenty of water throughout the year. They do well in full sun to semi-shade and respond well to regular feeding with a controlled release fertiliser and compost. They are sensitive to cold and need to be sheltered from frost, as it can damage the flowers and leaves.  Riverbanks and on forest margins,

The plant can grows to 2 m (6.6 ft) tall, with large, strong leaves 25–70 cm (9.8–27.6 in) long and 10–30 cm broad, produced on petioles up to 1 m (39 in) long. The leaves are evergreen and arranged in two ranks, making a fan-shaped crown. The flowers stand above the foliage at the tips of long stalks. The hard, beak-like sheath from which the flower emerges is termed the spathe. This is placed perpendicular to the stem, which gives it the appearance of a bird's head and beak; it makes a durable perch for holding the sunbirds which pollinate the flowers. The flowers, which emerge one at a time from the spathe, consist of three brilliant orange sepals and three purplish-blue or white petals. Two of the petals are joined together to form an arrow-like nectary. When the sunbirds sit to drink the nectar, the third petal opens to release the anther and cover their feet in pollen.
In Britain, bird-of-paradise flower cannot usually be grown outside as it requires a minimum temperature of 10 degrees celsius. During the winter, the plants should be kept almost dry but in summer they need plenty of water. A suitable compost can be made from one part loam, one and a half parts coir, one part grit and one part bark. The plants require regular feeding. Flowering occurs in spring and early summer and can be encouraged by keeping the plants slightly pot-bound.
Hand-pollination is necessary to produce seeds, but this seldom works. For germination and initial growth, the seeds need bottom-heat of at least 21 degrees celsius. Some new stocks of seed-raised plants can reach flowering size in two to three years, but individual specimens may take up to ten years. Due to the difficulty of producing seeds, Strelitzia reginae is usually propagated by dividing the plants or using suckers produced at the base. Mature plants should not be re-potted too often, as the fleshy roots can easily be damaged by disturbance.

HISTORT
Native to the eastern coast of South Africa, from Humansdorp to northern KwaZulu-Natal, Strelitzia reginae was introduced into Britain in 1773. In 1772, Francis Masson, a Scottish botanist, who started work at the Royal Gardens at Kew in the 1760s as an under-gardener, had been selected by Joseph Banks, de facto head of the garden at the time, to travel to South Africa with Captain Cook on HMS Resolution and collect plants. Strelitzia reginae was one of more than 500 newly discovered species that he sent back to England.
Banks named the exotic looking plant Strelitzia in honour of Queen Charlotte, wife of George III and Duchess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, who lived at Kew for many years; the specific epithet reginae means 'of the queen'. The plant's common names, bird-of-paradise or crane flower, are references to the exotic orange and blue flowers that look like crests on birds' heads.

Each striking flower head is an inflorescence composed of four to six flowers that emerge successively from a stiff, horizontal, greenish-pink, beak-like bract (modified leaf). The flower comprises six showy parts: three upright orange outer parts and three blue inner parts.
The blue inner parts are highly modified; two are joined together in a structure that resembles an arrowhead and the third forms a nectary at the flower base. White anthers emerge from the top of the arrowhead and when a pollinator, usually a sunbird or weaverbird, lands on the arrowhead in search of the thick, sticky nectar, pollen is deposited on the bird's feet or breast. Birds also assist in seed distribution; the black seeds have an intense orange aril (an outgrowth from the seed), an edible enticement.

Widely used in landscaping in warm temperate climates and as a conservatory or pot plant where temperatures fall below freezing, Strelitzia reginae is also popular in the cut-flower trade. In its native home, strained decoctions of the inflorescence have been used by the abakwaMthethwa clan in KwaZulu-Natal to treat inflamed glands and venereal diseases, whilst the seeds are used in the Cape to sour milk.

Due to their warm climate. It is a common ornamental plant in Southern California, and has been chosen as the Official Flower of the City of Los Angeles.

Strelitzia reginae is propagated by seed or division. Seedlings are slow-growing and will not bloom for three to five years, though it can exceptionally flower at two years. It flowers only when properly established and division of the plant may affect flowering patterns. The flowers are, however, quite long-lasting once they appear. Peak flowering is in the winter and early spring. There is a yellow-flowered cultivar of this plant known as ‘Mandela's Gold’.

White bird of paradise (Strelitzia alba)—This tropical flowering plant has large foliage and white flowers.

Crane lily (Strelitzia reginae)—The most elegant of the Strelitzia varieties—hence the name regal. The crane lily is a popular houseplant and has vibrant orange and blue flowers.

Mountain strelitzia (Strelitzia caudata)—Also called the “wild banana,” grows outdoor and has white, spiky flowers.

White bird of paradise (Strelitzia nicolai)—A stunning example of a tall indoor house plant with white and blue flowers.

African desert banana (Strelitzia juncea)—Native to South Africa, this drought-resistant plant has orange flowers that are typical of birds of paradise plants.

Fruits: The fruit is a leathery capsule containing numerous small seeds, each with an orange aril (an outgrowth from the seed similar to the red sheath (mace) around fresh nutmeg seeds) and an oil body, possibly attractive to birds which may help to distribute the seeds.







All plants in the genus Strelitzia—birds of paradise and crane lilies—are toxic. According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), birds of paradise are poisonous for cats, dogs, and horses. Ingesting parts of the plant can cause irritation, vomiting, or drowsiness.
 The ingestion of flowers and seeds can cause dizziness, vomiting, diarrhea and drowsiness in humans.



Indoors house plants,  conservatorys, Gardens,
City and courtyard gardens
Mediterranean climate plants
Patio and container plants
Sub-tropical
greenhouse
Cut flowers
The flowers attract bees, which are important members of any garden. Sunbirds are known to drink the nectar out of the flowers. It is also, simply, an ornamental flower that is a popular addition to bouquets and arrangements.


The Strelitzia reginae has been used to treat inflamed glands and sexually transmitted diseases in some KwaZulu-Natal cultures. In addition, those African cultures in the Cape are known to put the seeds into milk to accelerate the souring process.







Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #605 on: January 19, 2022, 12:24:23 PM »


HI

You may see this plant in Greek gardens close to the building

African flag

Chasmanthe floribunda  Is a species of flowering plants in the iris family which is known by the common names are African flag Cobra lily.  Includes 3 species of bulbous perennial plants native to South Africa. Some species are: Chasmanthe floribunda, Chasmanthe aethiopica, Chasmanthe bicolor.
This plant is endemic to Cape Province in South Africa, but it has been introduced to other areas of similar climate, and is considered to be naturalized in California, Algeria, Australia, Argentina, Europe, and St. Helena.
Chasmanthe floribunda is a perennial sprouting from a corm and producing clumps of long, narrow leaves. It erects one thin, tall stem which may approach a meter in height. Atop the stem is a spike inflorescence holding 20 to 40 flowers in neat vertical rows. The flower is a curving tube with a long upper lobe curving down over smaller lobes. From the mouth of the flower protrude the stamens with their large, hanging anthers, and the style. The flower is generally bright orange-red or scarlet on the upper lobe and yellow to orange in the lower lobes.

Family:   Iridaceae
Genus:   Chasmanthe
Species:   C. floribunda
Binomial name
Chasmanthe floribunda

HABITAT
Soil type: Sandy, Clay, Loam : Full Sun, Morning Sun (Semi Shade), Afternoon Sun (Semi Shade)  Its coastal habit means that it rarely experiences extreme climatic conditions in nature and will not withstand temperatures much below freezing.
The fruits develop into large, swollen capsules that split open at maturity to expose the seeds
 In nature they are found in dampish spots on rocky outcrops.

Chasmanthe (kaz-man’thee) was apparently named for the way the petal tips spread widely, from the Greek chasmamai (yawning or gaping) and anthos (flower). The botanist who created this genus name was probably influenced by the fact that Chasmanthe was formerly included in the genus Antholyza (an-tho-lies’uh). The species remaining in Antholyza have petals spread wide, like the mouth of a raging beast, and their genus name derives from the Greek anthos (flower) and lyssa (rabies). The gape of Chasmanthe petals is a minor echo of that major roar. The specific epithet floribunda (flor-ih-bun’-duh) is from the Latin and means “having many flowers.”







Unkown can not find much



Gardens Parks Landscape chasmanthe provides a good cut flower in a season when few are available and attracts hummingbirds  It looks good planted in clumps or drifts behind informal plantings that might include large succulents such as century plant (Agave americana). Cottage/Informal, Beds and borders


Few Iridaceae are used in traditional medicine or as food and Chasmanthe aethiopica is no exception. For gardeners, however, its early flowering and ease of cultivation make it a very worthwhile plant.

Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #606 on: January 24, 2022, 10:17:23 AM »


HI

I know a fer of you have seen this plant on the cliff path https://arillas.com/forum/index.php/topic,147.msg37076.html#msg37076

Blue rock bindweed

Convolvulus sabatius

Also known as the ground blue-convolvulus or blue rock bindweed  is a species of flowering plant in the family Convolvulaceae, native to Italy and North Africa, and often seen parts Europe It is a woody-stemmed trailing perennial plant, growing to 20 cm (8 in) in height. It has slightly hairy leaves and light blue to violet flowers, often with a lighter centre, which are 2.5–5 cm (1–2 in) in diameter.
The Latin specific epithet sabatius refers to the Savona region of Italy.
This species is often sold under the synonym C. mauritanicus. Although a perennial, it is best treated as an annual in colder climates. It is suited to window boxes and containers and prefers a sunny situation with good drainage. Tip pruning encourages new growth and flowering. It has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.

Family:   Convolvulaceae
Genus:   Convolvulus
Species:   C. sabatius
Binomial name
Convolvulus sabatius
Viv.
Synonyms
Convolvulus mauritanicus Boiss.

The Flowering plant family Convolvulaceae, with over 600 species.
 It is a large and diverse group, with common names including morning glory, water convolvulus or kangkung, sweet potato, bindweed, moonflower, and many more common names
(Greek καλός kalós "good" and νύξ, νυκτός núx, nuktós, "night") are called moonflowers.

HABITAT
In sun or part shade Prostrate or scrambling perennial Soil Type Normal or Sandy or Clay Drought Tolerant can be invasive
Blooming Time
  Early Summer
  Mid Summer
  Late Summer
  Early Autumn

 Very popular, and widely grown in California, this beautiful low groundcover is also worth trying in other regions. Plants form a low, trailing mat of round green leaves, bearing a long display of funnel-shaped lavender to violet-blue flowers. Excellent for rock gardens or edging, particularly in hot sunny areas. Also a good candidate for tubs and mixed containers or baskets.




                  different leaf shapes




NONE Convolvulus sabatius has no toxic effects reported.


Convolvulus sabatius is known for attracting bees and other pollinators. It nectar-pollen-rich-flowers.
  Alpine & Rock  Containers  Drought Tolerant  Edging  Evergreen  Ground Cover hanging basket Cottage and informal garden
Patio and container plants Flower borders and beds


COULD NOT FIND ANY INFO

Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #607 on: January 31, 2022, 09:38:13 AM »


Hi

You may see this plant on waste ground or in Greek gardens

snake flower

Bulbine frutescens other common names are burn jelly plant, stalked bulbine, cat's tail  is a rhizomatous perennial forming wide-spreading dense clumps of linear, fleshy green leaves to 45cm high. Flowers are orange or yellow, borne in long racemes above the leaves, flowering throughout the year in suitable conditions.
 family Asphodelaceae and subfamily Asphodeloideae,
A species of flowering plant in the genus Bulbine, native to southern Africa (South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland and thoughout Europe).  and a few others in Australia and Yemen.
Bulbine frutescens is mostly dormant in summer, blooming in the spring, depending on the climate and then again in autumn although somewhat less. It can be propagated easily by stem cuttings. The cuttings can be planted immediately and kept in a shady area. They do not need any special attention or treatment, and build strong roots in a couple of months.

Family:   Asphodelaceae
Subfamily:   Asphodeloideae
Genus:   Bulbine
Species:   B. frutescens
Binomial name
Bulbine frutescens

If a mature bulbine flower clump's center starts to flop over, it is time to divide the plant. Dig up the plant cluster including the roots and pull the clump apart into individual plants. The best time to divide and replant this succulent is right before the rainy season starts.

HABITAT
Full sun to part shade Well–drained Alkaline, Neutral  It is widespread in the Eastern Cape Province, and often found in dry river valleys and rocky gorges. Its grows in soils derived from shale or sandstone, but always on well drained sites. it tolerates hot temperatures, dry and sandy soils, and blooms throughout the warm months.
Bulbine is a genus of succulent plants with flowers borne in lax or compound racemes.  In grassland, woodland and forest, sometimes at altitudes above 1,800 m Hardiness: Protect from wet and will go down to -7c
Tolerates: drought tolerant / salt tolerant / deer resistance / rabbit resistance


Is Bulbine an aloe?
frutescens. Species of Bulbine resemble Haworthia and Aloe in appearance, but with soft, fleshy leaves and tuberous roots or a caudex. They are shrubs, weedy perennials, dwarf geophytes, and soft annuals.

The Plant List includes 158 scientific plant names of species rank for the genus Bulbine. Of these 76 are accepted species names.

The Plant List includes a further 9 scientific plant names of infraspecific rank for the genus Bulbine. We do not intend The Plant List to be complete for names of infraspecific rank. These are primarily included because names of species rank are synonyms of accepted infraspecific names.


HISTORY
The corms of mature plants are nutritious, containing calcium and iron, and were used as food by Aboriginal people, who called it parm, puewan, and pike. They regarded the corms as the sweetest-tasting of the lily and lily-like Australian plants
 Bulbine plant parts are traditional medicines of the Xhosa and Zulu peoples of southern Africa. The genus name Bulbine stems from the Greek bolbine or bolbos, meaning “bulb” or “onion.” In Latin, Bulbine means “little onion” or “bulb.”
The genus Bulbine was named by German botanist Nathanael Matthäus von Wolf (1724-1784) in his 1776 publication Genera plantarum vocabulis characteristicis definita, referring to Anthericum as a synonym.
A survey of local indigenous people, herbalists, and traditional healers in Eastern Cape province found that an aqueous decoction of dried whole plant (including roots, rhizomes, and leaves) of B. latifolia is used to treat stomach ailments and rheumatism. A decoction of the ground leaves of B. latifolia also is used in traditional veterinary medicine in Eastern Cape province to control parasites, including ticks and helminths, in goats. The leaf sap of B. narcissifolia is used traditionally for burns, wounds, and rashes, and the leaf sap of B. natalensis is used for diarrhea, burns, rashes, sunburn, corns, and warts. Decoctions of both dried whole plant and leaf of B. frutescens are used for treating diarrhea and topically for burns, rashes, blisters, insect bites, cracked lips, and mouth ulcers. In western Free State, B. narcissifolia tea is taken orally to treat kidney problems.



 



NONE  Not poisonous.
Six species are native to Australia. ... Some species of Bulbine have toxic foliage (e.g. Bulbine bulbosa, Australia) especially to livestock, although the tubers of this and other species are roasted and eaten by bushmen.



Gardens,pot tubs, Parks  Bees are attracted to the flowers.The flowers attract adult butterflies
 The leaf juice of B. frutescens is also produced in South Africa for soap and veterinary applications (i.e., to help increase skin hydration and elasticity).The leaves contain compounds that are very similar to those found in Aloe vera
It is often, incorrectly, been called Bulbinella.
An extract of Bulbine frutescens has been included in commercial shampoos as a moisturizer.


In the European Union (EU), B. frutescens leaf juice is authorized for use as a skin-conditioning component of cosmetic products.
The market for ingredients and products made from South African species of Bulbine is growing beyond the region and entering Europe and the Americas in the form of cosmetics, personal care products, dietary supplements, natural health products, novel foods, and veterinary products
A recent use is topical application of B. frutescens leaf gel to soothe new tattoos, applying the anti-inflammatory and wound-healing properties of the gel. New global demand may not be satisfied by sustainably sourcing solely from wild populations.





Offline vivian

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #608 on: February 06, 2022, 03:17:43 PM »


HI


You can see this plant around Arillas also outside Ammos in pots

I have done this plant before but i have gone more in detail

Cock's comb

Celosia  Is a small genus of edible and ornamental plants in the amaranth family, Amaranthaceae. The generic name is derived from the Ancient Greek word κήλεος (kḗleos), meaning "burning", and refers to the flame-like flower heads. Species are commonly known as woolflowers, or, if the flower heads are crested by fasciation, cockscombs. The plants are well known in East Africa's highlands and are used under their Swahili name, mfungu.
 It grows widespread across Mexico, where it is known as "velvet flower",
northern South America, tropical Africa, the West Indies, South, East and Southeast Asia where it is grown as a native or naturalized wildflower, europe,mediterranean
Celosia argentea var. argentea or Lagos spinach (a.k.a. quail grass, soko, celosia, feather cockscomb) is a broadleaf annual leaf vegetable.
HABITAT
Having been cultivated in North America since the 18th century, Celosias are native to the tropical and subtropical Americas, Africa and Asia and are considered to be weeds in their native habitat. Celosia range in size from 6-inch dwarf varieties, to vigorous types more than three feet tall.
Commonly called “cockscomb”, these species have plumed, huge spiked blossoms, usually crimson or yellow, that look like a rooster's comb. The other common type, called “woolflower” is crested with a twisted formation and a more feathery, globular shape.
 in full sun or partial shade. Alternatively, you can start celosia indoors four weeks before the last frost.
Celosia argentea is a tender annual that is often grown in gardens. It blooms in mid-spring to summer. It is propagated by seeds. The seeds are extremely small, up to 43,000 seeds per ounce. The flowers are hermaphrodites.
Family:   Amaranthaceae
Subfamily:   Amaranthoideae
Tribe:   Celosieae
Genus:   Celosia
Celosia is a genus of about 50 species in the family Amaranthaceae,
Celosia symbolism:
Celosia symbolize
 immortality, affection, warmth, humor and friendship.





The Flamingo Feather can be seen at the TRIA

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Celosia is primarily used as a leafy vegetable. The leaves and tender stems are cooked into soups, sauces or stews with various ingredients including other vegetables such as onions, hot pepper and tomato, and with meat or fish and palm oil. Celosia leaves are tender and break down easily when cooked only briefly.
The texture is soft; the flavor very mild and spinach-like. These boiled greens are often added to stews. They are also pepped up with such things as garlic, hot pepper, fresh lime, and red palm oil and eaten as a side dish.
Belonging to the edible and ornamental amaranth family, celosia is characterized by a soft, wooly, flamed bloom or a fascinating, cockscomb tip. ... The leaves offer a spinach-like flavor with basil-like texture while the flowers vary depending on the soil they're grown in.
Landscape, Parks, tubs, Pots, Gardening,




The flowers and seed are astringent, haemostatic, ophthalmic, parasiticide and poultice. They are used in the treatment of bloody stool, haemorrhoid bleeding, uterine bleeding, leucorrhoea, dysentery and diarrhoea
 Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for centuries, celosia works its magic in cases of retinal degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, blurred vision, cataracts and bloodshot eyes. This impressive botanical is also used to treat uterine bleeding, bloody stool and bleeding hemorrhoids.
 As a parasiticide it is very effective against Trichomonas, a 20% extract can cause the Trichomonas to disappear in 15 minutes
 It is used in the treatment of bloodshot eyes, blurring of vision, cataracts and hypertension, but should not be used by people with glaucoma because it dilates the pupils. The seed also has an antibacterial action, inhibiting the growth of Pseudomonas.

    Thanks for that Kev, the Celosia Cristata is the first plant I took a photo of in Arillas and I used to have it as my photo when Deme started the forum. Quite a long time ago. xx

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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #609 on: February 08, 2022, 09:23:00 AM »


HI

You can see this plant early spring in Greek gardens

Wandflower

sparaxis Other common names harlequin flower,  is a bulb-forming perennial plant that grows in well-drained sunny soil. It gained its name from its colorful flowers which are bi- or tri-coloured with a golden centre and a small ring of brown surrounded by another colour.
Family: Iridaceae. Genus contains about 15 species.
 Half hardy bulb commonly grown as a half hardy annual by gardeners.
The plant is native to southern Africa. It is present in California and Australia as an introduced species after having escaped from garden cultivation The genus Sparaxis has been introduced and cultivated in Europe since the 1780s (Du Plessis & Duncan 1989; Goldblatt & Manning 2013). The genus belongs to the Iridaceae family and was described by Ker Gawler in 1802.
Growing Region: Zones 3 to 10. As a perennial in zones 8 to 10.

Family:   Iridaceae
Genus:   Sparaxis
Species:   S. tricolor
Binomial name
Sparaxis tricolor

HABITAT
Full Sun Sand, clay and many others.  in coastal  species is able to develop in soils near gardens, dump sites and abandoned houses. This is not common in its original natural habitat.
Height: 10 to 24 inches (25 to 60 cm).Flower Details: Red, yellow, cream, purple, pink; often multicoloured. Bell-shaped. Sometimes fragrant.
Heathland, heathy woodland, lowland grassland, grass woodland, dry sclerophyll forest, dry sclerophyll woodland, riparian areas and ephemeral wetlands.
Foliage: Upright-blade. Narrow. Linear-lanceolate.can be moved to a frost-free position over winter.

Sparaxis is from the Greek sparasso meaning I tear and refers to the torn tips of the spathe "leaf" under the flower.



     

UNKONWN COULD NOT FIND ANYTHING


Regarding its uses, It is used on terraces and balconies, as cut flowers and rockeries, mixed borders and curbs. In all these places its main function is decoration.
Patio and container plants



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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #610 on: February 11, 2022, 10:49:52 AM »

HI

This plant can be seen outside ARILLAS it can be mistaken for A agapanthus  [Lily of the Nile] and garlic

society garlic

Tulbaghia violacea
Also known as  pink agapanthus, spring bulbs, wild garlic, sweet garlic, spring flowers The genus Tulbaghia is endemic to southern Africa and contains 20-30 species, with a concentration of species in the Eastern Cape of South Africa.  and reportedly naturalized in Tanzania and Mexico. Also in the UK and Europe
Growing to 60 cm (24 in) tall by 25 cm (10 in) wide, it is a clump-forming perennial with narrow leaves and large clusters of fragrant, violet flowers from midsummer to autumn

Family:   Amaryllidaceae
Subfamily:   Allioideae
Genus:   Tulbaghia
Species:   T. violacea
Binomial name
Tulbaghia violacea

HABITAT
Rocky grasslands and stream banks in semi-desert to boggy areas. Species from dry habitats have seed coats with cells capable of taking up water quickly, whilst those from wet habitats have seed coats with cells that appear impermeable to water.
 well-drained soil in full sun.Forest margins
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: mildly acid, neutral and basic (mildly alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil.  Your local summer or all year round in warm climates

One of the odd aspects of the most of the plants in the genus is that they are pollinated by moths at night when the plant manages to be lightly scented. T. violacea however is scented in the day and pollinated by bees and butterflies. (Moths are out only at night and butterflies only in the day.)
The flowers and leaves are edible raw, no debate there. The peppery leaves can be used like garlic in salads and other dishes. The flowers are on the peppery sweet side, onion-ish. The bulbs, however, are more medicinal though there are reports of them being eaten as well. A native of South Africa it is a favored food and medicine of the Zulus. The botanical name is Tulbaghia violacea (tool-BAG-ee-uh vee-oh-LAY-see-ay or vie-oh-LAY-see-ay) Tulbaghia honors Ryk Tulbagh, 1699-1771, governor of the Cape of Good Hope. Violacea means violet-like, referring to the blossom.

It’s called Society Garlic because Dutch settlers to South Africa thought it was a more polite spice to use for flavoring dishes than true garlic particularly for social events. Oh… and alliacea… (al-lee-AY-see-uh) means like onions.

Outside southern Africa, species such as Tulbaghia violacea have been cultivated as perennial garden novelties, especially in dry, well-drained situations. However, for centuries, Tulbaghia species have been used as medicine, food, fodder and ornamentals in their African native ranges. Recently, the belief that Tulbaghia consumption does not taint the breath has seen the promotion of society garlic as a garlic substitute. The medicinal properties of Tulbaghia species that have been used in traditional medicine in South Africa have become the subject of much orthodox medicinal interest,

They grow from fat, tuberous roots which spread to form clumps of plants. The pinkish to mauve, tubular flowers, clustered into umbels of up to twenty flowers are on flower stalks above the leaves. They smell of garlic when picked. Triangular capsules replace the flowers and are grouped into a head. When ripe they split to release flattened, hard black seeds.

It may smell like marijuana or skunk to those familiar with either smell. There have been instances in which concerned neighbors have contacted the police about the smell of cannabis in the neighborhood only to find out that the culprit was actually lemon verbena or society garlic


 






NONE

cultivated as perennial in gardens T. violacea leaves are eaten as a substitute for chives and garlic. In South Africa, Zulu people eat the leaves and flowers as a leaf vegetable like spinach or for seasoning meat and potatoes
Leaves and stems - raw or cooked. A mild garlic flavour, they are used as a flavouring in soups and salads. Flowers - raw or cooked. They can be added to salads, used as a garnish or as a flavouring in cooked foods. The flowers are very ornamental, they have a sweet, onion-like heat in the mouth.
 Tulbaghia violacea keeps snakes, mosquitoes, ticks and fleas away. In the garden, they attract bees, butterflies and moths.
Landscape Uses: Border, Container, Ground cover, Rock garden, Seashore. Special Features: Attractive foliage, Suitable for cut flowers. Fragrant flowers. Attractive flowers or blooms.



Tulbaghia species have been used as medicine, The medicinal properties of Tulbaghia species that have been used in traditional medicine in South Africa have become the subject of much orthodox medicinal interest, particularly as sources of antimicrobials, cardiovascular drugs and antioxidants. Extracts of Tulbaghia violacea kill a broad range of bacteria, including Staphylococcus and potentially tuberculosis, and nematode worms. Tulbaghia violacea and Tulbaghia alliacea both show distinctive antifungal activities with the potential to make cheap fungicides. Tulbaghia violacea has also been shown to have antioxidant properties and positive effects on high blood pressure.
The leaves are used to treat cancer of the oesophagus










Offline vivian

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #611 on: February 13, 2022, 01:57:38 PM »


                              Kev I need help, these huge caterpillars have aready killed our willow tree and now on this one, how can I get rid of them humainly and what kind of moth or butterfly are they. Nobody here seems to have seen them before but we have been invaded and certainly wouldent expect anything like this this time of year.

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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #612 on: February 14, 2022, 09:18:34 AM »


HI Vivian

Puss Moth

Cerura vinula  A plump, green caterpillar with a dark, white-edged 'saddle'. The head is surrounded by a pink patch, with false eyes making it look like a giant face. There are two thin tails.
Is a large white or greyish-white furry moth, the Puss moth is named after the cat-like appearance of the adult. The female is generally larger and also differs in having a grey hindwing and sometimes forewing.

Eggs are laid singly, or in twos or threes on the uppersides of leaves. When disturbed and as a warning, the striking caterpillars will raise their head and wave twin tails, which have pinkish extendable flagellae. They may even squirt formic acid at the attacker if the defence warning is unheeded. Caterpillars can be found from July to September and will often strip entire stems of leaves before pupating in a hard cocoon spun on a tree trunk or post, incorporating wood chewed by the larva.
Here they will overwinter before emerging as an adult the following spring

Size and Family
Family – Notodontidae
Large Sized
Wingspan Range – 45-70mm

Flight Season
Flies from May to July in one generation.

Conservation status
UK BAP: Not listed
Common

Caterpillar Food Plants
Caterpillars feed on poplars (populus) and willows (salix), particularly low regrowth or suckers of Aspen and Goat Willow in sunny places.

Habitat
Gardens, hedgerows, open woodland, moorland and scrub.


Distribution
Countries – England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland
Fairly frequent throughout most of the British Isles, but not recorded from Shetland. Local and rare in the Channel Islands.


The caterpillars of that moth are covered in hairs which conceal toxic spines. The spines can give a very painful sting and causing severe burning and a rash . Some might even feel swelling, nausea, headache, or respiratory issues.



How do you get rid of Puss Moth caterpillars?
The best way to control the Asp caterpillar in your garden is by using a pesticide containing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt).


















Offline vivian

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #613 on: February 14, 2022, 04:41:15 PM »


HI Vivian

Puss Moth

Cerura vinula  A plump, green caterpillar with a dark, white-edged 'saddle'. The head is surrounded by a pink patch, with false eyes making it look like a giant face. There are two thin tails.
Is a large white or greyish-white furry moth, the Puss moth is named after the cat-like appearance of the adult. The female is generally larger and also differs in having a grey hindwing and sometimes forewing.

Eggs are laid singly, or in twos or threes on the uppersides of leaves. When disturbed and as a warning, the striking caterpillars will raise their head and wave twin tails, which have pinkish extendable flagellae. They may even squirt formic acid at the attacker if the defence warning is unheeded. Caterpillars can be found from July to September and will often strip entire stems of leaves before pupating in a hard cocoon spun on a tree trunk or post, incorporating wood chewed by the larva.
Here they will overwinter before emerging as an adult the following spring

Size and Family
Family – Notodontidae
Large Sized
Wingspan Range – 45-70mm

Flight Season
Flies from May to July in one generation.

Conservation status
UK BAP: Not listed
Common

Caterpillar Food Plants
Caterpillars feed on poplars (populus) and willows (salix), particularly low regrowth or suckers of Aspen and Goat Willow in sunny places.

Habitat
Gardens, hedgerows, open woodland, moorland and scrub.


Distribution
Countries – England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland
Fairly frequent throughout most of the British Isles, but not recorded from Shetland. Local and rare in the Channel Islands.


The caterpillars of that moth are covered in hairs which conceal toxic spines. The spines can give a very painful sting and causing severe burning and a rash . Some might even feel swelling, nausea, headache, or respiratory issues.



How do you get rid of Puss Moth caterpillars?
The best way to control the Asp caterpillar in your garden is by using a pesticide containing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt).














Thanks Kev, they not very good at there seasons then. Glad I waited for your replie before I let the kids up the road pick them of. They reckon they look like some Walt Disney carrictor but forgotten from what film.  I will tell them all about them and then if they come in garden its not our fort. The moth locks loverly. but my goddness they can really strip trees. Thanks once again Kev,xx

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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #614 on: February 16, 2022, 10:24:33 AM »

HI

You can see this plant around Arillas in fields


Silver horehound

Marrubium incanum  is a genus of flowering plants in the family Lamiaceae, native to temperate regions of Europe, North Africa, and Asia as far east as the Xinjiang region of western China. A few species are also naturalized in North and South America.
The name Marrubium comes from (Latin: Marruvium, Marrubium; Ancient Greek: Μαρούϊον, romanized: Maroúïon) is a comune and town in the province of L'Aquila in the Abruzzo region of central Italy. It is on the eastern shore of the dried Lake Fucino, 20 kilometres (12 mi) from the remains of another ancient site, Alba Fucens.
 M. incanum is a spreading, hairy, deciduous perennial with white-hairy stems bearing ovate to oblong, scalloped or toothed, grey-green leaves, white-felted beneath. Upright stems bear dense whorls of pale lilac to white flowers in early summer.

Family:   Lamiaceae
Subfamily:   Lamioideae
Genus:   Marrubium
L.

Upright perennial herb Evergreen with Lilac, or white flowers for 2-3 months in summer..tolerates drought..gray wooly leaves.
 The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs)

HABITAT
Chalky, Loamy, Sandy in poor well-drained soil in full sun Waste ground Roadsides on cliffs rocks
 It is hardy to UK zone 3 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from June to November, and the seeds ripen from August to October. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees. The plant is self-fertile.
It is noted for attracting wildlife.
The root pattern is rhizomatous with underground stems sending roots and shoots along their length it can be  invasive

HISTORY
Horehound has been mentioned in conjunction with medicinal use dating at least back to the 1st century BC, where it appeared as a remedy for respiratory ailments in the treatise De Medicina by Roman encyclopaedist Aulus Cornelius Celsus
 The Roman agricultural writer Columella lists it as a remedy for expelling worms in farm animals in his important first-century work On Agriculture.
 Since then, horehound has appeared for similar purposes in numerous herbals over the centuries, such as The Herball, or, Generall historie of plantes by John Gerard, and Every Man His Own Doctor: or, The Poor Planter’s Physician by Dr. John Tennent.

Horehound is usually found in disturbed and overgrazed areas. It is highly unpalatable to livestock, so livestock eat other plants around it, a process that favors the persistence and spread of the weed. It may persist in native vegetation that has been grazed.








White horehound is LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth in food amounts. It's POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth as a medicine. However, taking white horehound by mouth in very large amounts is POSSIBLY UNSAFE.  Heart rhythm, blood pressure, and blood glucose levels affected by large doses. Avoid during pregnancy and breast feeding. Diabetes mellitus patients on allopathic medication to lower blood sugar should avoid

Pollinated by Bees It is noted for attracting wildlife. Beds and borders, Gravel, Ground Cover, Rock
The leaves are used as a seasoning  Bitter and pungent, they are sometimes used to flavour herb beer or liqueurs  A mild pleasantly flavoured tea is made from the fresh or dried leaves Horehound ale is a fairly well-known drink made from the leaves  bittersweet hard candies like cough drops  They are dark-colored, dissolve in the mouth, and have a flavor that has been compared to menthol and root beer. and the rock and rye cocktail



Marrubium vulgare is a plant with high bioactive potential. It contains marrubiin, a labdane diterpene that is characteristic for this genus, as well as a complex mixture of phenolic compounds. According to numerous studies, M. vulgare acts as a good antioxidant agent, and due to this, it could potentially be useful in treatments of cancer, diabetes mellitus, and liver diseases. In addition, its anti-inflammatory, wound-healing, antihypertensive, hypolipidemic, and sedative potential are discussed.
White horehound is a well-known and popular herbal medicine that is often used as a domestic remedy for coughs, colds, wheeziness etc. The herb apparently causes the secretion of a more fluid mucous, readily cleared by coughing. The leaves and young flowering stems are antiseptic, antispasmodic, cholagogue, diaphoretic, digestive, diuretic, emmenagogue, strongly expectorant, hepatic, stimulant and tonic. Horehound is a very valuable pectoral, expectorant and tonic that can be safely used by children as well as adults. It is often made into a syrup or candy in order to disguise its very bitter flavour, though it can also be taken as a tea. As a bitter tonic, it increases the appetite and supports the function of the stomach. It can also act to normalize heart rhythm. The plant is harvested as it comes into flower and can be used fresh or dried. The root is a remedy for the bite of rattlesnakes, it












 

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