Author Topic: Walking around corfu  (Read 197084 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline kevin-beverly

  • ARILLIAC
  • *
  • Posts: 2036
Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #465 on: July 25, 2020, 11:17:24 AM »

HI

This subject will blow your mind Lets start

Which fruits are berries? Get a pen a piece of paper and write them down what you think is a BERRY

Berry is a fleshy fruit without a stone (pit) produced from a single flower containing one ovary
 Berries so defined include grapes, currants, and tomatoes, as well as cucumbers, eggplants (aubergines) and bananas, but exclude certain fruits that meet the culinary definition of berries, such as strawberries and raspberries. The berry is the most common type of fleshy fruit in which the entire outer layer of the ovary wall ripens into a potentially edible "pericarp". Berries may be formed from one or more carpels from the same flower (i.e. from a simple or a compound ovary). The seeds are usually embedded in the fleshy interior of the ovary, but there are some non-fleshy exceptions, such as peppers, with air rather than pulp around their seeds.
Many berries are edible, but others, such as the fruits of the potato and the deadly nightshade, are poisonous to humans.
A plant that bears berries is said to be bacciferous or baccate (a fruit that resembles a berry, whether it actually is a berry or not, can also be called "baccate").
In everyday English, a "berry" is any small edible fruit. Berries are usually juicy, round, brightly coloured, sweet or sour, and do not have a stone or pit, although many small seeds may be present.

Botanically speaking, a berry has three distinct fleshy layers: the exocarp (outer skin), mesocarp (fleshy middle) and endocarp (innermost part, which holds the seeds). For instance, a grape's outer skin is the exocarp, its fleshy middle is the mesocarp and the jelly-like insides holding the seeds constitute the endocarp, Jernstedt told Live Science.

When a strawberry flower is pollinated, the fruit doesn't swell. The fertilized ovaries in the flower form separate, small, dry fruits. Those “seeds” on the outside of a strawberry are actually the fruits, each of which contains a single seed.


The olive is the small, bitter-tasting fruit of the olive tree, Olea europea. Olives are classified as fruit because they're formed from the ovary of the olive flower, and they're seed-bearing structures - those small stones (or pits) that you leave on the side of your plate could grow into trees if you planted them.
It Turns Out Olives Are Actually Fruits and Not Vegetables
The stones inside act as the seeds for the Olea europaea tree. In any botanist's book that means they're technically classified as fruits — specifically a kind called drupes, a.k.a. stone fruits.

This may help





Examples of botanical berries include:

Avocado contains a single large seed surrounded by an imperceptible endocarp. Avocados are however also sometimes classified as drupes.
Banana
Barberry (Berberis), Oregon-grape (Mahonia aquifolium) and mayapple (Podophyllum spp.) (Berberidaceae)
Strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) (not to be confused with the strawberry (Fragaria), which is an accessory fruit), bearberry (Arctostaphylos spp.), bilberry, blueberry, cranberry, lingonberry/cowberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea), crowberry (Empetrum spp.) (family Ericaceae)
coffee berries (Rubiaceae) (also described as drupes)
Gooseberry and currant (Ribes spp.; Grossulariaceae), red, black, and white types
Aubergine/Eggplant, tomato, goji berries (wolfberry) and other species of the family Solanaceae
Elderberry (Sambucus niger; Adoxaceae)
Indian gooseberry (Phyllanthus emblica) (Phyllanthaceae)
Garcinia gummi-gutta, Garcinia mangostana (mangosteen) and Garcinia indica in the family Clusiaceae
Sapodilla (Manilkara zapota), Sapotaceae
Grape, Vitis vinifera in the family Vitaceae
Honeysuckle: the berries of some species are edible and are called honeyberries, but others are poisonous (Lonicera spp.; Caprifoliaceae)
Persimmon (Ebenaceae)
Pumpkin, cucumber and watermelon in the family Cucurbitaceae


Modified berries
A specialized term, pepo, is also used for fruits of the gourd family, Cucurbitaceae, which are modified to have a hard outer rind, but are not internally divided by septae. In epigynous berries, the berry includes tissue derived from parts of the flower besides the ovary.




Offline Eggy

  • On the Spot reporter
  • ARILLIAC
  • *
  • Posts: 5392
Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #466 on: July 25, 2020, 07:22:37 PM »
"Berry" good , Kevin.

Offline kevin-beverly

  • ARILLIAC
  • *
  • Posts: 2036
Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #467 on: August 07, 2020, 10:56:50 AM »


HI

purple loosestrife

Lythrum salicaria Common  names include spiked loosestrife and purple lythrum.It is a flowering plant belonging to the family Lythraceae.
Lythrum salicaria is a herbaceous perennial plant, that can grow 1–2 m tall, forming clonal colonies 1.5 m or more in width with numerous erect stems growing from a single woody root mass. The stems are reddish-purple or red to purple and square in cross-section. The leaves are lanceolate, 3–10 cm long and 5–15 mm broad, downy and sessile, and arranged opposite or in whorls of three.
The flowers are reddish purple, 10–20 mm diameter, with six petals (occasionally five) and 12 stamens, and are clustered tightly in the axils of bracts or leaves; there are three different flower types, with the stamens and style of different lengths, short, medium or long; each flower type can only be pollinated by one of the other types, not the same type, thus ensuring cross-pollination between different plants.The flowers are visited by many types of insects, and can be characterized by a generalized pollination syndrome.
[Pollination syndrome is  suites of flower traits that have evolved in response to natural selection imposed by different pollen vectors, which can be abiotic (wind and water) or biotic, such as birds, bees, flies, and so forth. These trait includes flower shape, size, colour, odour, reward type and amount, nectar composition, timing of flowering, etc. For example, tubular red flowers with copious nectar often attract birds; foul smelling flowers attract carrion flies or beetles, etc.
The "classical" pollination syndromes were first studied in the 19th century by the Italian botanist Federico Delpino. Although they have been useful in developing our understanding of plant-pollinator interactions, an uncritical acceptance of pollination syndromes as providing a framework for classifying these relationships is rather out of date.]
Family:   Lythraceae
Genus:   Lythrum
Species:   L. salicaria
Binomial name
Lythrum salicaria
L. salicaria is very variable in leaf shape and degree of hairiness, and a number of subspecies and varieties have been described, but it is now generally regarded as monotypic with none of these variants being considered of botanical significance. The species Lythrum intermedium Ledeb. ex Colla is also now considered synonymous.
The fruit is a small 3–4 mm capsule containing numerous minute seeds. Flowering lasts throughout the summer. When the seeds are mature, the leaves often turn bright red through dehydration in early autumn; the red colour may last for almost two weeks. The dead stalks from previous growing seasons are brown.
HABITAT
Lythrum salicaria is capable of invading a variety of wetland habitats, including marshes, river and stream banks, pond edges, lakes, road site ditches, and reservoirs. The plant prefers moist soil with neutral to slightly acidic pH. Once established, however, L. salicaria can exist in a wide range of soil types. Disturbed areas are more prone to invasion because exposed soil is ideal for germination.

Name meaning: Lythrum salicaria
Lythrum - from one of the Greek words for blood, with complex meaning;

salicaria - willow-like, referring to the leaves or flower spikes


Purple loosestrife is a very hardy perennial which can rapidly degrade wetlands, diminishing their value for wildlife habitat. ... Purple loosestrife also invades drier sites. Concern is increasing as the plant becomes more common on agricultural land, encroaching on farmers' crops and pasture land.

Native range: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belgium, Bulgaria, China, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Republic of Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco Netherlands, Pakistan, Occupied Palestine Territory, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russian Federation, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Syrian Arabic Republic, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom (UK)
Known introduced range: Australia, Canada, Ethiopia, New Zealand, South Africa, United States (USA)

It has been used as an astringent medicinal herb to treat diarrhea and dysentery; it is considered safe to use for all ages, including babies. It is also cultivated as an ornamental plant in gardens, and is particularly associated with damp, poorly drained locations such as marshes, bogs and watersides. However, it will tolerate drier conditions. The flowers are showy and bright, and a number of cultivars have been selected for variation in flower colour,

The greatest danger the aggressive spread of purple loosestrife plants present is to marshes, wet prairies, farm ponds and most other aquatic sites. They are so prolific that they can take over a site in a single year, making loosestrife plant care difficult.






   


Lythrum salicaria has no toxic effects reported.

Gardens,Parks,Widely sold as an ornamental,In landscaping,Young leaves eaten in small amounts. There are claims that the root is edible, although this is questionable  no reference in the ethnobotanical record. Note
 flowers being used as a natural red dye or the color the leaves turn in autumn.  A red hair dye was once made from the flowers   The dye can also be used as a food colouring.



Purple loosestrife has been used in traditional (folk) medicine as a treatment for diarrhoea, chronic intestinal catarrh, haemorrhoids, eczema, varicose veins and bleeding of the gums
  Farmers used to hang the plants around the yokes of their oxen and workhorses to keep biting insects from agitating their animals.






Offline kevin-beverly

  • ARILLIAC
  • *
  • Posts: 2036
Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #468 on: August 12, 2020, 12:27:15 PM »


Hi

How do plants take up water to keep alive

Plants do not have a heart,to pump water around. The plant Kindom have two systems  to move food, water and minerals around the plant.
They are called xylem and phloem each one has a job to do.

xylem moves water and mineral ions from the roots to the leaves
Xylem, plant vascular tissue that conveys water and dissolved minerals from the roots to the rest of the plant and also provides physical support. Xylem tissue consists of a variety of specialized, water-conducting cells known as tracheary elements.

phloem  moves food substances such as sucrose (sugar) and amino acids from leaves to the rest of the plant.
Phloem is the living tissue in vascular plants that transports the soluble organic compounds made during photosynthesis and known as photosynthates, in particular the sugar sucrose, to parts of the plant where needed. This transport process is called translocation.

translocation  Both of these systems contain cells that make continuous tubes running the full length of the plant from the roots, up the stem and through the leaves. They are like blood vessels for the plant.

Plants absorb water from the soil by osmosis. They absorb mineral ions by active transport, against the concentration gradient. Root hair cells are adapted for taking up water and mineral ions by having a large surface area to increase the rate of absorption. They also contain lots of mitochondria, which release energy from glucose during respiration in order to provide the energy needed for active transport.


it is a reactant used in photosynthesis and supports leaves and shoots by keeping the cells rigid it cools the leaves by evaporation and transports dissolved minerals around the plant






what is temporary wilting in plants ? well it looks like this it looks like it is dying



Wilting is the loss of rigidity of non-woody parts of plants. This occurs when the turgor pressure in non-lignified plant cells falls towards zero, as a result of diminished water in the cells. ... The rate of loss of water from the plant is greater than the absorption of water in the plant.

The plant will recover when the temperature drops or when you water the plant if you got pot plants you can do this
Revive the plants quickly by setting their pots in a sink filled with room-temperature water. The water should come about halfway up each pot's side. Leave the pots in the sink for at least one hour, or until the soil feels wet at the top to you; for some plants, the process can take several hours.

Stomata
 are tiny holes found in the underside of leaves. They control water loss and gas exchange by opening and closing. They allow water vapour and oxygen out of the leaf and carbon dioxide into the leaf.

Plants growing in drier conditions tend to have small numbers of tiny stomata and only on their lower leaf surface, to save water loss. Most plants regulate the size of stomata with guard cells. Each stoma is surrounded by a pair of sausage-shaped guard cells. In bright light the guard cells take in water by osmosis and become plump and turgid. In low light the guard cells lose water and become flaccid, causing the stomata to close. They would normally only close in the dark when no carbon dioxide is needed for photosynthesis. Guard cells are adapted to their function by allowing gas exchange and controlling water loss within the leaf.

The size of the stomatal opening is used by the plant to control the rate of transpiration and therefore limit the levels of water loss from the leaf. This helps to stop the plant from wilting.




How Do Plants Deal with Dry Days?

If there is no water around, what can plants do to survive? Amazingly, all plants seem to have a number of genes for drought-defense strategies encoded in their DNA. Genes are small sections of DNA, like chapters in a book. How they use these genes determines their ability to survive drought.
Some plants are drought-resistant. When we talk about drought-resistant plants, we mean plants that can withstand dry conditions without dying. A drought-resistant plant can survive drought by using three defense strategies: escaping, avoiding or tolerating the loss of water. Drought tolerant plants are quite rare in nature and can endure long periods with no water at all. Some of the most spectacular drought tolerant plants are called resurrection plants. Resurrection plants are able to survive long periods (up to 3 years!) without any water. However, give them a little water and they will spring back to life in a day or two. Other drought-resistant plants may not be as spectacular, but they too can survive short periods of drought using special techniques and defense strategies.




Offline kevin-beverly

  • ARILLIAC
  • *
  • Posts: 2036
Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #469 on: August 16, 2020, 11:27:40 AM »


HI

You may have seen this plant on your walks

Sumac

Rhus common names are sumach, sumak, soumak, and sumaq is any one of about 35 species of flowering plants in the genus Rhus and related genera, in the family Anacardiaceae. It grows in subtropical and temperate regions throughout the world, especially in East Asia, Africa, and North America
The sumac plant is a wild bush that primarily grows across the Mediterranean region, stretching from Italy to Greece to Lebanon. While sumac is most commonly used in the Middle East, and can be found cultivating in places like Turkey and Iran, the sumac flower is primarily grown in temperate and subtropical areas of Africa and North America.
In addition to its rich culinary history, which dates back beyond the Roman empire, the health benefits of this ancient spice were first documented thousands of years ago in Greek medicinal texts, which noted sumac’s antiseptic qualities.
Sumacs are dioecious shrubs and small trees in the family Anacardiadeae that can reach a height of 1–10 m (3.3–32.8 ft). The leaves are usually pinnately compound, though some species have trifoliate or simple leaves. The flowers are in dense panicles or spikes 5–30 cm (2.0–11.8 in) long, each flower very small, greenish, creamy white or red, with five petals. The fruits are reddish, thin-fleshed drupes covered in varying levels of hairs at maturity and form dense clusters at branch tips, sometimes called sumac bobs.
Sumacs propagate both by seed (spread by birds and other animals through their droppings), and by new shoots from rhizomes, forming large clonal colonies.

Family:   Anacardiaceae
Subfamily:   Anacardioideae
Genus:   Rhus
Type species
Rhus coriaria

HABITAT
 is very hardy and generally grows in open places such as roadsides, forest edges and clearings. It likes lots of sun and tolerates most soil types, including poor dry areas. This species is very pest and disease resistant.

What Is Sumac?
Made from the dried and ground berries of the wild sumac flower, sumac is a tangy spice with a sour, acidic flavor reminiscent of lemon juice. This fragrant spice is used to brighten up dry rubs, spice blends like za'atar, and dressings. Sumac is also commonly used as a garnish, to add a pop of bold color or slight acidity to a dish before serving.
The majority of sumac found in grocery stores and marketplaces is ground from the dried berries of the sumac bush and sold as a coarse powder. While it is possible to purchase whole sumac berries in some parts of the world, it is uncommon to find these berries in most areas.
The plant’s berries bloom from early spring through late fall, depending on where you happen to live  and it is possible to pick, dry, and grind your own, assuming you know what to look for. The staghorn sumac (or rhus typhina), for instance, blooms in fall and boasts vibrant red cones reaching up from fuzz-covered branches. Once these fiery cones have ripened, snip the bloom, take them home, and hang them to dry. A simple spice grinder will do the rest of the hard work, once the berries have shriveled.




 

NONE
Although all sumac sold for consumption is safe to eat, there is also a poisonous form of the plant found in the wild, which is identifiable by its white berries and drooping leaves in contrast to edible sumac’s bold red berries.


ornamental in gardens parks landscape Cooking in drinks salads




The antioxidant value of sumac spice is phenomenal. When herbs and spices are rated for antioxidant levels sumac sits atop the list, even above commonly used spices like cinnamon and oregano. ...
Sumac spice can help lower blood sugar levels. ...
Sumac juice is high in vitamin C.

Parts of smooth sumac have been used by various Native American tribes as an antiemetic, antidiarrheal, antihemorrhagic, blister treatment, cold remedy, emetic, mouthwash, asthma treatment, tuberculosis remedy, sore throat treatment, ear medicine, eye medicine, astringent, heart medicine, venereal aid, ulcer treatment,

 Regulates Blood Sugar
High blood sugar can take a real toll on many aspects of health. In the short term, it can cause symptoms like fatigue, headaches, frequent urination and increased thirst. Over time, sustaining high levels of blood sugar has even more serious consequences, including nerve damage, kidney problems and impaired wound healing.

Reduces Cholesterol
High in Disease-Fighting Antioxidants
May Reduce Bone Loss
Relieves Muscle Pain








Offline Eggy

  • On the Spot reporter
  • ARILLIAC
  • *
  • Posts: 5392
Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #470 on: September 10, 2020, 11:07:47 AM »
Kev
These are all the cuttings that I we were talking about. Each taken from one plant.
and..... Tria will be first stop , for me , on Saturday.


.

.

Offline kevin-beverly

  • ARILLIAC
  • *
  • Posts: 2036
Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #471 on: September 11, 2020, 08:12:56 AM »

Hi Neil

A type of Fern till it gets its true leaves I don’t know
Aloe it looks like
Yucca
Coleus A lovely little colourful plant it’s leaves so bright.
go to google type in Coleus then go to images have a look at all the colours








Offline Eggy

  • On the Spot reporter
  • ARILLIAC
  • *
  • Posts: 5392
Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #472 on: September 11, 2020, 10:33:12 AM »
Kev , those ferns, not sure of the correct name, all came from this boy.
.


The cuttings are a tad spindley, at the moment, but should shape, up like this one, in about 2 months.
.


Cheers
Negg

Offline kevin-beverly

  • ARILLIAC
  • *
  • Posts: 2036
Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #473 on: September 11, 2020, 11:54:04 AM »


Neil try and take a photo of the leaves I can’t see the leaf stems

Kev



Offline Eggy

  • On the Spot reporter
  • ARILLIAC
  • *
  • Posts: 5392
Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #474 on: September 11, 2020, 12:40:02 PM »
Take a peek....

.
and...... those Aloe Vera come from this lil bugger!

.
and.... This is the largest of 6 watermelon's that on on the move! (about 16inches long and 7kg at mo)


Too much time on my hands this morning. Maybe get the polish out!!
Negg

Offline kevin-beverly

  • ARILLIAC
  • *
  • Posts: 2036
Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #475 on: September 11, 2020, 03:04:42 PM »



Hi Neil
It is a Sago palm not a Fern
And  my gosh what a biggin Neil

Kev



Offline Eggy

  • On the Spot reporter
  • ARILLIAC
  • *
  • Posts: 5392
Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #476 on: September 11, 2020, 05:17:06 PM »
That comment takes me back a few years , Kev. = Tell Phil to get the beer in for avrio.
Neill

Offline kevin-beverly

  • ARILLIAC
  • *
  • Posts: 2036
Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #477 on: September 17, 2020, 12:14:19 PM »


HI
Neil [EGGY] has asked  me about this plant you can get this plant on corfu

CHOKKU OR CHOKO

Chayote  Known as mirliton and choko, is an edible plant belonging to the gourd family,
Gourd Is the fruits of some flowering plant species in the family Cucurbitaceae, particularly Cucurbita and Lagenaria. The term refers to a number of species and subspecies, many with hard shells, and some without. One of the earliest domesticated types of plants, subspecies of the bottle gourd, Lagenaria siceraria, have been discovered in archaeological sites dating from as early as 13,000 BC. Gourds have had numerous uses throughout history, including as tools, musical instruments, objects of art, film, and food.
History of Gourd L. siceraria or bottle gourd, thought to have originated in southern Africa, was brought to Europe and the Americas very early in history, being found in Peruvian archaeological sites dating from 13,000 to 11,000 BC and Thailand sites from 11,000 to 6,000 BC. A study of bottle gourd DNA published in 2005 suggests that there are two distinct subspecies of bottle gourds, domesticated independently in Africa and Asia, the latter approximately 4,000 years earlier. The gourds found in the Americas appear to have come from the Asian subspecies very early in history, although a new study now indicates Africa. The archaeological and DNA records show it is likely that the gourd was among the first domesticated species, in Asia between 12,000 and 13,000 years before present, and possibly the first domesticated plant species.
Wild, poisonous gourds (Citrullus colocynthis) were unknowingly added to the company of prophets' stew according to a story of Elisha in the Hebrew Bible. Elisha added flour to the stew in order to purify it.
Gourds continued to be used throughout history in almost every culture throughout the world. European contact in North America found extensive gourd use, including the use of bottle gourds as birdhouses to attract purple martins, which provided bug control for agriculture. Almost every culture had musical instruments made of gourds, including drums, stringed instruments common to Africa and wind instruments, including the nose flutes of the Pacific

. Chayote was one of the several foods introduced to the Old World during the Columbian Exchange. Also during this period, the plant spread from Mesoamerica to other parts of the Americas, ultimately causing it to be integrated into the cuisine of many other Latin American nations.

The chayote fruit is mostly used cooked. When cooked, chayote is usually handled like summer squash; it is generally lightly cooked to retain the crispy consistency. Raw chayote may be added to salads or salsas, most often marinated with lemon or lime juice, but is often regarded as especially unpalatable and tough in texture. Whether raw or cooked, chayote is a good source of vitamin C.
Although most people are familiar only with the fruit as being edible, the root, stem, seeds and leaves are edible as well. The tubers of the plant are eaten like potatoes and other root vegetables, while the shoots and leaves are often consumed in salads and stir fries, especially in Asia.

Family:   Cucurbitaceae
Genus:   Sechium
Species:   S. edule
Binomial name
Sechium edule
(Jacq.) Sw.
Synonyms
Chayota edulis Jacq.
Sicyos edulis Jacq.

The common American-English name of the fruit (outside of Louisiana) is from the Spanish word chayote, a derivative of the Nahuatl word chayohtli . In Louisiana (as in Haiti), it is known as mirliton  also spelled mirletons or merletons  In Australia, New Zealand and Singapore, it is known as choko which comes from the 19th century Cantonese market gardeners who introduced many vegetables into the former two countries. In the eastern Caribbean it is known as christophene, while it is chou chou in Jamaica and tayota in the Dominican Republic. In eastern and north eastern India chayote is known as squash and is a very popular vegetable used in both vegetarian and non vegetarian dishes.
HABITAT
In its native habitat, chayote grows over shrubs, runs along fences and also climbs vertically on trees. In order to flourish, this herb needs a humid soil that is well drained and a prolonged, warm growing season. In farms where chayote is cultivated commercially, the plants are supported by erecting strong trellis.
Like other members of the gourd family, chayote has a sprawling habit, and requires sufficient room. The roots are also highly susceptible to rot, especially in containers, and the plant in general is finicky to grow. However, in Australia and New Zealand it is an easily grown yard or garden plant, set on a chicken wire support or strung against a fence. In Trinidad and Tobago, it is grown in the mountainous areas strung from wire lines.

In the most common variety, the fruit is roughly pear-shaped, somewhat flattened and with coarse wrinkles, ranging from 10 to 20 cm in length. It looks like a green pear, and it has a thin, green skin fused with the green to white flesh, and a single, large, flattened pit. Some varieties have spiny fruits. The flesh has a fairly bland taste, and a texture is described as a cross between a potato and a cucumber.
The chayote vine can be grown on the ground, but as a climbing plant, it will grow onto anything, and can easily rise as high as 12 meters when support is provided. It has heart-shaped leaves, 10–25 cm wide and tendrils on the stem. The plant bears male flowers in clusters and solitary female flowers. The plant’s fruit is light green and elongated with deep ridges lengthwise.


"Apple pie"
In Australia, a persistent urban legend is that McDonald's apple pies were made of chokos (chayotes), not apples. This eventually led McDonald's to emphasise the fact that real apples are used in their pies. This legend was based on an earlier belief that tinned pears were often disguised chayotes. A possible explanation for the rumor is that there are a number of recipes in Australia that advise chayotes can be used in part replacement of canned apples to make the fruit go farther in making apple pies. This likely arose because of the economies of "mock" food substitutes during the Depression Era, shortages of canned fruit in the years following World War II, and the fact apples do not grow in many tropical and subtropical parts of Australia, making them scarce. Chayotes, on the other hand, grow extensively in Australia, with many suburban backyards featuring chayote vines growing along their fence lines and outhouses.

Mummies
Due to its purported cell-regenerative properties, it is believed as a contemporary legend that this fruit caused the mummification of people from the Colombian town of San Bernardo who extensively consumed it. The very well preserved skin and flesh can be seen in the mummies today.





NONE

Although botanically classified as fruits, chayote squashes are prepared like vegetables. Every part of the squash can be eaten, including its skin, flesh, and seeds. You can consume it raw or cooked. When served raw, it makes a great addition to smoothies, slaws, and salads  You could even consider adding it to soups, stews, and casseroles for an extra boost of nutrition.


chayote is prized for being high in potassium, vitamin C, and amino acids. The leaves and fruit have diuretic, cardiovascular, and anti-inflammatory properties. A tea made from the chayote plant's leaves has been used in the treatment of arteriosclerosis, hypertension, and kidney stones.
May promote heart health
Eating chayote squash may improve several heart disease risk factors, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and poor blood flow.
Animal and test-tube research indicates that chayote compounds may help relax blood vessels, thereby improving blood flow and reducing blood pressure

May promote blood sugar control
Chayote squash is low in total carbs and high in soluble fiber, which may help regulate blood sugar levels

May support a healthy pregnancy
Folate, or vitamin B9, is essential for all people — but it’s particularly important for those who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant.
During early pregnancy, folate is required for proper development of the fetal brain and spinal cord. Adequate folate intake may also play a role in preventing preterm births

May have anticancer effects
Higher fruit and vegetable consumption is associated with a reduced risk of various types of cancer, including those of the digestive tract

May support liver function
Fatty liver disease is a condition in which excess fat is deposited into liver tissue. Too much fat in your liver can affect its ability to function properly


















Offline Eggy

  • On the Spot reporter
  • ARILLIAC
  • *
  • Posts: 5392
Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #478 on: September 17, 2020, 05:06:11 PM »
Well Dun U.
I can put a u-tube link on if anyone wants further info as to cooking etc.
Negg

Offline kevin-beverly

  • ARILLIAC
  • *
  • Posts: 2036
Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #479 on: September 18, 2020, 09:31:10 AM »