Author Topic: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu  (Read 819566 times)

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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Reply #2220 on: January 18, 2017, 08:44:01 AM »


HI ALL

L FOR LITSA

KEVIN



Offline Jo Wissett

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Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Reply #2221 on: January 18, 2017, 03:24:09 PM »
Just love that jetty pic Sonia, very arty!


Offline Eggy

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Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Reply #2222 on: January 18, 2017, 05:39:24 PM »
M is for Mandarins - growing at our Kavaddades garden.



Negg

Offline Eggy

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Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Reply #2223 on: January 18, 2017, 05:41:08 PM »
N is for Nickos - No prizes for guessing the name of his Taverna.




Offline patrickjohn

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Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Reply #2224 on: January 18, 2017, 06:30:31 PM »
It could only the the Night Owl - am sorry no prizes are on offer though!
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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Reply #2225 on: January 19, 2017, 08:49:32 AM »


HI ALL

O FOR OLIVE NETS

KEVIN



Offline Eggy

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Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Reply #2226 on: January 19, 2017, 09:45:19 AM »
P is for Pony , on the way down to Arillas from the Afionas Road.

(Been waiting a long time for a "P" - Not good at my age.
Negg

Offline Eggy

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Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Reply #2227 on: January 19, 2017, 09:48:29 AM »
Q is for Quite Strange!



Found on a bush , in the Garden. - Any guesses.
Negg

Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Reply #2228 on: January 19, 2017, 11:49:44 AM »


MR NEGG

It could be a the Oleander hawk-moth, Daphnis nerii

Metamorphosis
December 19, 2009 by Krishna Mohan
When I returned to my in-laws place at Bondel, Mangalore, I was eagerly greeted by my daughter who showed this plump green caterpillar which she sighted on the flowering bush in their garden. She had seen the similar caterpillar earlier at her school backyard and wanted to know the identification. There were 3 caterpillars on that Crape jasmine (Tabernaemontana divaricata) plant. They were caterpillars of the of the oleander hawk-moth.



The Oleander hawk-moth, Daphnis nerii (Linnaeus, 1758), one of the most widely distributed species of sphingid in the world, is known to occur in Africa, southern Europe, Arabia, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand, Yunnan (south China), Hong Kong, Taiwan, the Philippines, Sumatra, Peninsular Malaysia, and North Borneo, and has been introduced to southern Japan, Hawaii, and Guam. Its vernacular name refers to the oleander, Nerium oleander (family Apocynaceae), on which its larvae feed, among other members in its family of poisonous, laticiferous plants. Incidentally, the Oleander was also first described by renowned Swedish naturalist, Carolus Linnaeus in 1753. I had the great opportunity of photographing this moth earlier which I documented on this website here and here.
Entire body of this caterpillar was a pleasant apple green, with a straight, dorso-lateral row of small, aqua-marine dots from its second to seventh abdominal segments, with a chalky white, longitudinal band immediately above this. There was also a scattering of distinct, white dots from its first to fifth abdominal segments. Its spiracles were jet black, outlined with white. On its third thoracic segment, there was a prominent pair of ocelli (A marking that resembles an eye), consisting of an outer, Dark Blue ring with a whitish blue center, clearly advertised when its defensive posture (head tucked under) was adopted.
Its tail horn was relatively short and had a rounded tip. There was a sparse distribution of low, short spines over the entire tail horn, which was largely citrus-yellow. It was voraciously feeding on Crape jasmine leaves and excreting large greenish black pellets. Since it was dark we decided to visit and photograph it next day.

Next day morning when we went to visit the caterpillar again we just couldn’t find any apple green caterpillar. Previously apple-green body had transformed to a dirty orange on the flanks and an olive-brown on the dorsum. A symmetrical pair of round, black patches had also appeared on the top of its first thoracic segment, just posterior to its head.

The thick rings of its false eye spots had darkened to a black outline. The yellow of its posterior tail horn had now darker orange. This was pre-pupal metamorphosis of the caterpillar. What we saw yesterday was the final instar version of this caterpillar.As we were observing the caterpillar was descending to the ground. Then it dropped to the ground and started burrowing deep into the soil to pupate. I did not disturb its path and let it continue. In another 10days I was sure it is going to emerge out of its pupa and brilliantly colored oleander hawk moth which I had previously documented on my website.



Descriptions and illustrations of the larva and pupa of the oleander hawk-moth were provided previously by Bell & Scott (1937), with more recent works by Pittaway (1993) and Pittaway & Kitching (2009). Throughout its broad geographical distribution, the combined list of documented larval host plants for the oleander hawk-moth comprises no fewer than 32 genera in 12 families, clear indications of a polyphagous diet. However, there appears to be a strong preference for plants in the family Apocynaceae, with at least 17 genera (more than half) recorded. A most probable advantage of consuming potentially poisonous plants in this family would be the chemical defense that the larvae would be able to derive from them. For example, the leaves and other parts of the oleander contain a potent concoction of cardiac glycosides (cardenolides), such as oleandrin, which can cause nausea, vomiting, weakness, irregular pulse and decreased heart rate. The oleander has even been responsible for occasional fatalities in humans. Thus the plants in the Apocynaceae would confer the larvae considerable deterrence against a variety of predators.

 

i hope this helps kevin



Offline Eggy

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Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Reply #2229 on: January 19, 2017, 12:11:38 PM »
Reckon you're right , Kevin. - It was found on one of our Oleander bushes.
Negg

Offline patrickjohn

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Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Reply #2230 on: January 19, 2017, 12:19:30 PM »
How very interesting - the life cycle of the oleander hawk moth.  Thanks for sharing that - I learn something new every day.
Now on to the letter R.  I reckon the R is for RAILINGS - photograph by Julia on 13th September 2016 at the Kaloudis Village.



At the Splish Splash Pool

by pj's memories, on Flickr

All the best

Pat
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Offline soniaP

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Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Reply #2231 on: January 19, 2017, 01:39:33 PM »
Just love that jetty pic Sonia, very arty!
I can't take the credit for it Jo as Jonathan is the photographer in our house. I will pass your compliment onto him though.

Offline Eggy

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Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Reply #2232 on: January 19, 2017, 06:43:28 PM »
S is for Skeleton - Remind me to tell you the story , some time.



Offline soniaP

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Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Reply #2233 on: January 19, 2017, 08:23:58 PM »
T is for Truck in Pagi in June 2015






Offline Val n Bill

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Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Reply #2234 on: January 19, 2017, 09:02:03 PM »

 Neill I know you don't tend to eat much during the day..... but I think you have taken it a bit too far now.

   Val x
The love affair continues.