A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu

Started by TerryW, August 08, 2007, 01:15:09 PM

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

kevin-beverly



HI

T FOR  TABLE AND CHAIRS RAINBOW

KEV SEP 2008

Eggy


kevin-beverly



HI

V FOR     Vitis vinifera Vitis is right i am not sure Vinifera Located in Afionas Village of Corfu, the family-run 3 Brothers features accommodations with a balcony overlooking the Ionian Sea.

From raisins, to fruit salad, to wine – grapes provide a uniquely sweet, crisp flavor profile that offers a wide variety of uses. While green, white, and red grapes currently hold the spotlight as the most commonly used and eaten, there are rarer varieties that often go overlooked – their golden-hued counterparts, the yellow grapes.
There are currently only three types of grape that can solidly be classified as yellow, and because of this, it is important to understand what they are and what makes them so extraordinary.
In this article, we are going to explore the different strains of yellow grapes, their appearances, tastes, and locations, as well as what sets them apart from their cousins.
Vitis vinifera – commonly referred to as Dominga – is a grape strain native to the Mediterranean, which serves as a perfect environment in which these yellow grapes can grow. These plants thrive in direct sunlight, with shelter from the elements and roots that require sandy, well-drained soil. They are an excellent choice for amateur and intermediate growers, as they are simple plants that require little maintenance; in their ideal location, and with plenty of water, Dominga plants will yield beautiful, succulent fruits of a soft, subtle yellow.



kev sep 2008




Eggy

Wotta nice view from a bedroom balcony.

Cheers
Negg

kevin-beverly

HI

Nive garden Neil

X FOR   XIPHOPHYLLOUS     having sword-shaped leaves

KEV SEP 2017

kevin-beverly


Eggy

Kevin - You sure that was not a Y for yuck??? or yucca as before?
Negg

kevin-beverly



HI

NO PICS OF Z SO A BIT OF USELESS INFO  HAHA

X FOR    ZYGODACTYL

Zygodactyl: two toes in front (2, 3) and two in back (1, 4) – the outermost front toe (4) is reversed. The zygodactyl arrangement is a case of convergence, because it evolved in birds in different ways nine times.
In many perching birds – most woodpeckers and their allies, ospreys, owls, cuckoos (including roadrunners), most parrots, mousebirds, some swifts and cuckoo rollers.
Woodpeckers, when climbing, can rotate the outer rear digit (4) to the side in an ectropodactyl arrangement. Black-backed woodpeckers, Eurasian three-toed woodpeckers and American three-toed woodpeckers have three toes – the inner rear (1) is missing and the outer rear (4) points always backward and never rotates.
Owls, ospreys and turacos can rotate the outer toe (4) back and forth.


Typical toe arrangements in birds





Eggy

Kevin , not like you to find a Z or two?

I am told you spend most of yer day getting the Zzzzzzzzzz's in.

Cheers
Negg

kevin-beverly


HI

A FOR  ARGIOPE BRUENNICHI Wasp spider

kev


Eggy


HI

ARGIOPE BRUENNICHI

Kevin
Didn't he play for the England Team , last night??
Negg

kevin-beverly




Neil At lest he's got eight feet to dribble



kevin-beverly



HI

B FOR BUCKETS AND SPADES AND BALLS     Outside Alex's

kev aug 2022

Eggy

So yer talking buckets n spades now as well as Balls!!
 and... a pity those England players didn't have 8 legs!!

I know this is a Caterpillar....


but what are these Creatures?


Cheers
Negg

kevin-beverly

Quote from: kevin-beverly on December 14, 2020, 09:30:55 AM
Quote from: Eggy on December 13, 2020, 09:49:41 PMAlien beings who will creep into your ear and take over yer brain.
or maybe just some , difficult to identify , Bugs.
.

(Ear plugs in , when yer sleeping , just in case)
Cheers
Negg

HI Neil

Latin name  Eriosoma lanigerum
Common name  Woolly aphid also known as American blight
Main symptoms  Lumpy swellings on the bark and, in summer, colonies of aphids covered in white fluff on the trunk and branches

Woolly Aphid Control
 Since severe woolly aphid attacks rarely occur, there is little need for woolly aphid pesticide for control. Generally, their numbers are kept low with natural predators like lacewings, ladybugs, hover flies, and parasitic wasps. If desired, you can spot treat where the aphids are most abundant using insecticidal soap or neem oil. You can also prune out and destroy infested branches when feasible. When chemical control is deemed necessary, woolly aphid insecticide such as acephate (Orthene) can be used to control these pests.
NEIL you can use some cotton wool dipped in methylated spirits and just wipe the stems the white fluffy stuff


https://arillas.com/forum/index.php/topic,2310.msg141287.html#msg141287





Although the Woolly Aphids are not dangerous or poisonous to humans they're considered a notable nuisance; the irritant itself comes from what the Woolly Aphids produce - honeydew. ... The tiny sap feeders may probe the skin, giving a small bite sensation but they do not feed on humans or pets.