Author Topic: Walking around corfu  (Read 196766 times)

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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #360 on: January 14, 2020, 08:24:12 AM »


HI

Amaranthus  Known as Amaranth Love-Lies-Bleeding Careless, Cat Tail, Chenile Plant, Floramor, Foxtail, Foxtail Amaranth, Inca Wheat, Kiwicha, Lady's Riding Whip, Purple Amaranth, Quelite, Red-Hot-Cattail, Tassel Amaranth, Tassel Flower, Teasel Flower, Thrumwort, Tumbleweed, Velvet Flower is a cosmopolitan genus of annual or short-lived perennial plants. Some amaranth species are cultivated as leaf vegetables, pseudocereals, and ornamental plants. Most of the Amaranthus species are summer annual weeds and are commonly referred to as pigweed
Amaranth is a herbaceous plant or shrub that is either annual or perennial across the genus. Flowers vary interspecifically from the presence of 3 or 5 tepals and stamens, whereas a 7-porate pollen grain structure remains consistent across the family. Species across the genus contain concentric rings of vascular bundles, Leaves are approximately  (2.6–5.9 in) oval or elliptical shape that are either opposite or alternate across species, although most leaves are whole and simple with entire margins.
 Flowers are radially symmetric and either bisexual or unisexual with very small, bristly perianth and pointy bracts.
Fruits are in the form of capsules referred to as a unilocular pixdio that opens at maturity. The top (operculum) of the unilocular pixdio releases the urn that contains the seed. Seeds are circular form from 1-1.5 millimeters in diameter and range in color with a shiny, smooth seed coat. The panicle is harvested 200 days after cultivation with approximately 1,000 to 3,000 seeds harvested per gram.





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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #361 on: January 15, 2020, 08:39:55 AM »


HI

Amelanchier  known as shadbush, shadwood or shadblow, serviceberry or sarvisberry, or just sarvis, juneberry, saskatoon, sugarplum or wild-plum, and chuckley pear.
A genus of about 20 species of deciduous-leaved shrubs and small trees in the rose family Rosaceae.
Since classifications have varied greatly over the past century, species names are often used interchangeably in the nursery trade. Several natural or horticultural hybrids also exist, and many A. arborea and A. canadensis plants that are offered for sale are actually hybrids, or entirely different species. A. Χ grandiflora is another hybrid of garden origin, between A. arborea and A. laevis. The cultivar 'La Paloma' has gained the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit.
A taxon called Amelanchier lamarckii (or A. x lamarckii) is very widely cultivated and naturalized in Europe, where it was introduced in the 17th century. It is apomictic, breeding true from seed, and probably of hybrid origin, perhaps descending from a cross between A. laevis and either A. arborea or A. canadensis. While A. lamarckii is known to be of North American origin, probably from eastern Canada, it is not known to occur naturally in the wild in North America
 The bark is gray or less often brown, and in tree species smooth or fissuring when older. The leaves are deciduous, cauline, alternate, simple, lanceolate to elliptic to orbiculate, 0.5–10 x 0.5–5.5 cm, thin to coriaceous, with surfaces above glabrous or densely tomentose at flowering, and glabrous or more or less hairy beneath at maturity. The inflorescences are terminal, with 1–20 flowers, erect or drooping, either in clusters of one to four flowers, or in racemes with 4–20 flowers. The flowers have five white (rarely somewhat pink, yellow, or streaked with red), linear to orbiculate petals, 2.6–25 mm long, with the petals in one species (A. nantucketensis) often andropetalous (bearing apical microsporangia adaxially). The flowers appear in early spring, "when the shad run" according to North-American tradition (leading to names such as "shadbush"). The fruit is a berry-like pome, red to purple to nearly black at maturity, 5–15 mm diameter, insipid to delectably sweet, maturing in summer.





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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #362 on: January 16, 2020, 08:59:25 AM »


HI

Anagallis arvensis Known as scarlet pimpernel, blue-scarlet pimpernel, red pimpernel, red chickweed, poor man's barometer, poor man's weather-glass, shepherd's weather glass or shepherd's clock,
This common European plant is generally considered a weed and is an indicator of light soils, though it grows opportunistically in clayey soils as well.
Anagallis arvensis has a low-growing creeping habit, but as a winter annual, it forms a half-rosette with an upright stem.
 It has weak sprawling stems with square cross-section growing to about 5–30 centimetres long. They bear bright green, soft, ovate sessile leaves in opposite pairs. The orange, red or blue, radially symmetric flowers, about 10–15 millimetres  in diameter, are produced singly in the leaf axils from spring to autumn. The petal margins are somewhat crenate and have small glandular hairs. The stamens have lollipop hairs and therefore attract a variety of pollinators, especially flies, but the flowers are also capable of autopollination. The dehiscent capsule fruits ripen from August to October in the northern hemisphere. The weight of the fruiting body bends the stem, and the seeds are transported by the wind or rain. Blue-flowered plants (A. arvensis Forma azurea) are common in some areas, such as the Mediterranean region, and should not be confused with the related blue pimpernel, Anagallis foemina, sometimes Anagalis arvensis ssp. foemina. In 2007, a molecular phylogenetic study showed that Anagallis foemina is more closely related to Anagallis monelli than to Anagallis arvensis, and should be treated as a separate species.
Scarlet pimpernel flowers open only when the sun shines, and even close in overcast conditions. This habit leads to names such as "shepherd's weather glass". It has recently started to occur along the verges of salted roads, creating a broad red band along the roadside.
Scarlet pimpernel has a wide variety of flower colours. The petals of the type arvensis are bright red to minium-coloured; carnea is deep peach, lilacina is lilac; pallida is white; and azurea is blue. The blue form can be difficult to distinguish from A. foemina, but the petal margins are diagnostic: whereas foemina has clearly irregular petal margins with only 5 to 15 glandular hairs, A. arvensis f. azurea has 50 to 70 hairs on only slightly irregular margins.





 

Lysimachia monelli  formerly known as Anagallis monelli  They all look the same to me



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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #363 on: January 17, 2020, 08:56:06 AM »


HI

When you see a plant you like in a nursery or a shop you look at the name V. burkwoodii. and Viburnum x bodnantense ‘Dawn’ and Agapanthus inapertus ssp hollandii Do you wonder why is it in italics and got a X and SSP and so on

Today i will try and explain in easy language grab yourself a coffee


Why don't we use its 'common name'? in the plant world
It can cause confusion as a single common name sometimes refers to several different plants. For example, in the UK, woodbine is the common name for honeysuckle (Lonicera pericyclamenum), while in the US it is used to mean a clematis (Clematis virginiana).
Even in the UK some of our common wild flowers have many different common names (not always polite!) depending on what part of the country you are in.
But don't be put off. Latin names are as easy to use as common names.

Genus and species
Just think of plant names like your family name followed by your Christian name: Trump Donald, except that plants are called by their Genus and species: Rosa rugosa.
Etiquette demands that the Latin name be in italics, with a capital letter for the Genus, lower case for the species.

Subspecies, varieties and forms
In the wild, there will be the 'species' plant, which just has the Genus and species name. But nature is a contrary beast and plants may evolve that are very similar to the 'species' but have subtle differences.

A subspecies
is a distinct variant, usually based on geographical location, and its name is written Genus species subsp. Subspecies. For example, here's a spurge called Euphorbia characias subsp. wulfenii.

A variety
is a plant that has a slightly different natural botanical structure. Its name is written Genus species var. variety. For example, Phyllostachys nigra var. henonis is a variety of black bamboo.

A form
is a plant that has a minor difference to the species, such as leaf colour, flower colour or fruit. Its name is written Genus species f. form. The form Rosa rugosa f. alba has white flowers. Often the 'f' is left out, so you will see the name written Rosa rugosa alba.

Cultivars and hybrids
A cultivar is any new plant that comes about in cultivation (rather than in the wild). This is regardless of whether the new plant was 'planned' - the result of a plant breeder deliberately hybridising (crossing) two plants of the same genus - or whether it is an accident - the result of plants doing it themselves! The cultivar name is written Genus species 'Cultivar', for example, Rosa rugosa 'Scabrosa'. Etiquette demands that a capital letter is used for the cultivar name and that it is in quotation marks.

Sometimes the parents' names are not known, or have been lost in the mists of time, so only the Genus and Cultivar names are used. For example, Dahlia 'Bishop of Llandaff' or Phormium 'Sundowner'.

A hybrid
 is a new plant that is the result of a cross between two botanically distinct species. The name x Genus species. Most crosses occur at species level. For example; Forsythia x intermedia 'Lynwood', which is as a result of crossing Forsythia suspensa with Forsythia viridissima.

Relatives
Another great benefit of Latin names is that you can see quickly which plants are related as they have the same Genus name. There are more than 3,000 types of rose available in the UK.
And if you really 'get into' names you'll find that every Genus belongs to a bigger group called a family. So, believe it or not, tomatoes, potatoes, chillies and deadly nightshade all belong to the same family, called Solanaceae. Then there are roses, strawberries, pears, apples, and hawthorn - they're members of the Rosaceae family.

Difference between spp. and sp.?
Mostly spp. use for plural species and sp. for singular species. In manuscript some time people use spp for plural strains of same species

Learning the Latin names
As you learn a bit of Latin, you'll find you can often tell something about a plant from its name. Find out more about

Colour
•   alba/albus = white
•   coccinea/coccineus = scarlet
•   caerulea/caeruleus = blue


Smell
•   foetida/feotidus = smelly
•   fragans/fragrantissima = scented

Origin
•   chinensis = China
•   virginiana/virginianus = Virginia

Habitat
•   aquatica/auquaticus = water
•   arvensis = field

Shape
•   reptans = creeping
•   gracilis = slender

Sometimes a prefix or suffix is used
•   grandi- = large
•   leuco- = white
•   macro- = long or large
•   semper- = always
•   brevi- = short
•   -issima = very (foetidissima = very smelly!)





Sorry a bit boring but now you can understand the plant names 



Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #364 on: January 19, 2020, 11:40:53 AM »


HI

I hope that last post was not to Boring

Today a pretty little flower you will see in Arillas groing wild

Anemone Known as   wood anemone, windflower, thimbleweed, and smell fox, an allusion to the musky smell of the leaves. It is a herbaceous perennial plant growing 5–15 centimetres (2–6 in) tall.  a genus of about 200 species of flowering plants in the family Ranunculaceae, native to temperate zones. The genus is closely related to Pulsatilla ('Pasque flower') and Hepatica; some botanists even include both of these genera within Anemone.

Japanese anemones can grow 4 feet tall. Some double-flowered varieties may need staking to keep them from falling over. Japanese anemones spread by underground runners so can be divided every few years to keep them in bounds and produce more plants.

Anemone are perennials that have basal leaves with long leaf-stems that can be upright or prostrate. Leaves are simple or compound with lobed, parted, or undivided leaf blades. The leaf margins are toothed or entire.

Flowers with 4–27 sepals are produced singly, in cymes of 2–9 flowers, or in umbels, above a cluster of leaf- or sepal-like bracts. Sepals may be any color. The pistils have one ovule. The flowers have nectaries, but petals are missing in the majority of species.

The fruits are ovoid to obovoid shaped achenes that are collected together in a tight cluster, ending variously lengthened stalks; though many species have sessile clusters terminating the stems. The achenes are beaked and some species have feathery hairs attached to them.

Anemone are called "wind flowers". Anemone is derived from the Greek word anemoi, which in English means "winds".







The anemone is a flower from late spring (May — June), and there are many different species. ... All anemones are toxic to dogs, animals, and humans, because of the anemonin. Symptoms: it irritates the mucous membranes and causes blistering. It can also cause tremors and even seizures
Eating anemones may cause minor illnesses such as vomiting and diarrhea. The juice, sap or hairs of the plants can also cause dermatitis, or skin irritation. ... If you suspect someone has eaten the leaves, flowers or tubers of an anemone, or if symptoms appear, contact your doctor or the Poison Control Center.


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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #365 on: January 20, 2020, 08:31:40 AM »


HI

It is getting near to get back to Arillas.
Take a walk to the shops or to the beach even a stroll around you will always past a plant at sometime while in Arillas
so i have put this on explaining the leaf structures








Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #366 on: January 20, 2020, 08:56:14 AM »

HI

Arbutus unedo Known as the strawberry tree,  evergreen shrub or small tree in the family Ericaceae, native to the Mediterranean region and western Europe north to western France and Ireland. Due to its presence in southwest and northwest Ireland, it is known as either "Irish strawberry tree", or cain or cane apple (from the Irish name for the tree, caithne), or sometimes Killarney strawberry tree.
Despite the name, it is not the source of the common strawberry, which is obtained from Fragaria Χ ananassa, an unrelated plant.
The leaves are dark green and glossy,  (2–4 in) long and (0.79–1.18 in) broad, with a serrated margin.
The hermaphrodite flowers are white (rarely pale pink), bell-shaped, (0.16–0.24 in) diameter, produced panicles of 10–30 together in autumn. They are pollinated by bees, and have a mild sweet scent.
The fruit is a red berry,  (0.39–0.79 in) diameter, with a rough surface. It matures in about 12 months, in autumn, at the same time as the next flowering. It is edible; the fruit is sweet when reddish. Seeds are often dispersed by frugivorous birds

The name unedo is attributed to Pliny the Elder, who allegedly claimed that "unum tantum edo", meaning "I eat only one". It is not known whether he meant that the fruit was so good he could eat only one, or whether he meant that the fruit was uninteresting so he ate only one




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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #367 on: January 21, 2020, 08:15:15 AM »


HI

Here is a chart of the flower structure






Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #368 on: January 21, 2020, 08:37:33 AM »


HI 


Eruca vesicaria also known as rocket and Arugula  is an edible annual plant in the family Brassicaceae used as a leaf vegetable for its fresh, tart, bitter, and peppery flavor.
Eruca vesicaria grows  (8–39 in) in height. The pinnate leaves have four to ten small, deep, lateral lobes and a large terminal lobe. The flowers are  (0.8–1.6 in) in diameter, arranged in a corymb in typical Brassicaceae fashion, with creamy white petals veined in purple, and having yellow stamens; the sepals are shed soon after the flower opens. The fruit is a siliqua (pod) (0.5–1.4 in) long with an apical beak, and containing several seeds (which are edible).


 

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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #369 on: January 22, 2020, 08:35:09 AM »


Hi

Fraxinus Better known as Ash  or European ash or common ash  It contains 45–65 species of usually medium to large trees, mostly deciduous, though a few subtropical species are evergreen. The genus is widespread across much of Europe, Asia, and North America.
It is a large deciduous tree growing to (39–59 ft) (exceptionally to 43 m or 141 ft) tall with a trunk up to 2 m (6.6 ft) (exceptionally to 3.5 m or 11 ft) diameter, with a tall, narrow crown. The bark is smooth and pale grey on young trees, becoming thick and vertically fissured on old trees. The shoots are stout, greenish-grey, with jet black buds (which distinguish it from most other ash species, which have grey or brown buds). The leaves are opposite,  (7.9–13.8 in) long, pinnately compound, with 7–13 leaflets with coarsely serrated margins, elliptic to narrowly elliptic, (1.2–4.7 in) long and (0.31–1.18 in) broad and sessile on the leaf rachis. There are no stipules. These features distinguish ash from mountain ash (Sorbus aucuparia) in which the leaves are alternate with paired stipules. The leaves are often among the last to open in spring, and the first to fall in autumn if an early frost strikes; they have no marked autumn colour, often falling dull green. The flowers are borne in short panicles, open before the leaves, and have no perianth. The female flowers are somewhat longer than the male flowers, dark purple, without petals, and are wind-pollinated. Both male and female flowers can occur on the same tree, but it is more common to find all male and all female trees. A tree that is all male one year can
produce female flowers the next, and similarly a female tree can become male. The fruit is a samara  (0.98–1.77 in) long and  (0.20–0.31 in) broad, often hanging in bunches through the winter; they are often called 'ash keys'. If the fruit is gathered and planted when it is still green and not fully ripe, it will germinate straight away, however once the fruit is brown and fully ripe, it will not germinate until 18 months after sowing (i.e. not until two winters have passed).
European ash rarely exceeds 250 years of age. However, there are numerous specimens estimated between 200 and 250 years old and there are a few over 250. The largest is in Clapton Court, England and is 9 m (29.5 ft) in girth. There are several examples over 4.5 metres (14.8 ft) in Derbyshire alone.

In Greek mythology, the Meliae were nymphs of the ash, perhaps specifically of the manna ash (Fraxinus ornus), as dryads were nymphs of the oak. They appear in Hesiod's Theogony.

The ash exudes a sugary substance that is suggested to have been fermented to create the Norse Mead of Inspiration.

In Norse mythology, Yggdrasill was often seen as a giant ash tree. Many scholars now agree that in the past, an error had been made in the interpretation of the ancient writings, and that the tree is most likely a European yew (Taxus baccata).[citation needed] This mistake would find its origin in an alternative word for the yew tree in the Old Norse, namely needle ash (barraskr).In addition, ancient sources, including the Eddas, write about a vetgrψnster vida, which means "evergreen tree". An ash sheds its leaves in the winter, while yew trees retain their needles. The first man, Ask, was formed from the "ash tree".

Elsewhere in Europe, snakes were said to be repelled by ash leaves or a circle drawn by an ash branch. Irish folklore claims that shadows from an ash tree would damage crops. In Cheshire, ash was said to be used to cure warts and rickets. In Sussex, the ash tree and the elm tree were known as "widowmakers" because large boughs would often drop without warning.





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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #370 on: January 22, 2020, 08:41:57 AM »


HI

Here is a flower with all the part names both MONOCOTYLEDON and DICOTYLEDON





Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #371 on: January 23, 2020, 08:06:14 AM »


HI

Different flower structures




Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #372 on: January 23, 2020, 08:26:38 AM »


HI

Asphodelus  The genus is native to temperate Europe, the Mediterranean, Africa, the Middle East, and the Indian Subcontinent, and now naturalized in other places (New Zealand, Australia, Mexico, southwestern United States, etc.)
The plants are hardy herbaceous perennials with narrow tufted radical leaves and an elongated stem bearing a handsome spike of white or yellow flowers. Asphodelus albus and A. fistulosus have white flowers and grow from 1½ to 2 ft. high; A. ramosus is a larger plant, the large white flowers of which have a reddish-brown line in the middle of each segment.
The leaves are used to wrap burrata, an Italian cheese. The leaves and the cheese last about the same time, three or four days, and thus fresh leaves are a sign of a fresh cheese, while dried out leaves indicate that the cheese is past its prime

In Greek legend the asphodel is one of the most famous of the plants connected with the dead and the underworld. Homer describes it as covering the great meadow (ἀσφόδελος λειμών), the haunt of the dead. It was planted on graves, and is often connected with Persephone, who appears crowned with a garland of asphodels.[citation needed] Its general connection with death is due no doubt to the greyish colour of its leaves and its yellowish flowers, which suggest the gloom of the underworld and the pallor of death. The roots were eaten by the poorer Greeks; hence such food was thought good enough for the shades. The asphodel was also supposed to be a remedy for poisonous snake-bites and a specific against sorcery; it was fatal to mice, but preserved pigs from disease. The Libyan nomads made their huts of asphodel stalks.






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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #373 on: January 24, 2020, 08:17:20 AM »


HI

You will see this plant around Arillas

Atropa belladonna Known as  belladonna or deadly nightshade, is a perennial herbaceous plant in the nightshade family Solanaceae, which includes tomatoes, potatoes, and eggplant (aubergine). It is native to Europe, North Africa, and Western Asia. Its distribution extends from Great Britain in the west to western Ukraine and the Iranian province of Gilan in the east. It is also naturalised or introduced in some parts of Canada and the United States.
Atropa belladonna is a branching herbaceous perennial rhizomatous hemicryptophyte, often growing as a subshrub from a fleshy rootstock. Plants grow to 2 m (6.6 ft) tall with ovate leaves 18 cm (7.1 in) long. The bell-shaped flowers are dull purple with green tinges and faintly scented. The fruits are berries, which are green, ripening to a shiny black, and approximately 1.5 cm (0.59 in) in diameter. The berries are sweet and are consumed by animals that disperse the seeds in their droppings, even though they contain toxic alkaloids.
There is a pale-yellow flowering form called Atropa belladonna var. lutea with pale yellow fruit.




Belladonna is one of the most toxic plants found Atropa Belladona is a poisonous plant called deadly nightshade. It's a plant classified in the solanaceae family and its roots, leaves and fruits contain the belladonna alkaloids: atropine, hyocyamine, and scopolamine , responsible for the anticholinergic toxicity of the plant.
Ingesting just two to four berries from deadly nightshade can kill a child. Ten to 20 berries can kill an adult. ... Meet Atropa belladonna, more popularly known as deadly nightshade. The plant looks harmless enough, as its leaves are green and it grows up to 4 feet high
Symptoms of deadly nightshade poisoning include dilated pupils, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, headaches, confusion and convulsions.
Belladonna is LIKELY UNSAFE when taken by mouth. It contains chemicals that can be toxic. Side effects can include dry mouth, enlarged pupils, blurred vision, red dry skin, fever, fast heartbeat, inability to urinate or sweat, hallucinations, spasms, mental problems, convulsions, and coma.
Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor



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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #374 on: January 25, 2020, 11:07:26 AM »


HI

Aubrieta known as Aubretia and False Rockcress a genus of about 20 species of flowering plants in the cabbage family Brassicaceae. The genus is named after Claude Aubriet, a French flower-painter. It originates from southern Europe east to central Asia but is now a common garden escape throughout Europe. It is a low, spreading plant, hardy, evergreen and perennial, with small violet, pink or white flowers, and inhabits rocks and banks. It prefers light, well-drained soil, is tolerant of a wide pH range, and can grow in partial shade or full sun.The plants grow wild in Europe
The traditional single Aubrieta produce dainty four-petalled flowers over mounds of hairy foliage. Height 10cm, spread 60cm.
It has hairy leaves to minimise water loss from the leaf surface, making it drought tolerant

Have seen this plant around Arillas




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