Author Topic: Walking around corfu  (Read 276062 times)

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Offline Eggy

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #480 on: September 18, 2020, 11:04:10 AM »
Yer just a coiled spring , Kevin
Negg

Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #481 on: September 20, 2020, 09:32:59 AM »


HI
As i am on holiday drinking my Mythos i get tap on my shoulder why are my apple trees keep dying. I can not say wiyhout testing the soil and looking at the site for other factors what can cause the problem.

Mr Eggy [Neil] asked me why do my tomatoes keep spiting i hope this can help

What Causes Tomatoes to Crack?
Heavy rain, especially when preceded by dry weather, is the leading cause of fruit cracking and splitting in tomatoes. This type of damage is most likely to occur as tomatoes begin to ripen and you are anxiously anticipating harvest, though green fruit can be effected as well. Cracking and splitting occur when rapid changes in soil moisture levels cause fruits to expand quicker than the tomato skin can grow. There are two different patterns this damage may take. Vertical splits along the sides of fruits are known as radial cracking and are the most serious. This pattern of splitting commonly occurs during hot, humid weather. Cracking that occurs in a circular pattern at the top of tomato fruits, ringing the stem end, is known as concentric cracking. When cracking of either type occurs in green tomatoes, fruits are likely to rot before they fully ripen if left on the vine.
With both radial and concentric cracking, your best option is to harvest fruits immediately, before they begin to rot. These fruits are edible and can be allowed to finish ripening indoors, though any fruit that develops a sour smell or begins to ooze should go straight to the compost pile. Fruits that ripen off the vine, as well as those that ripen on the vine during cloudy, rainy weather will be less flavorful than those that mature fully on the plant during sunny weather.





A good tip is if your tomatoes are splitting you can put them in the freezer for winter stews dont throw out Neil


Tomatoes are triggered to turn red by a chemical called ethylene. Ethylene is odorless, tasteless and invisible to the naked eye. When the tomato reaches the proper green mature stage, it starts to produce ethylene. The ethylene then interacts with the tomato fruit to start the ripening process. Consistent winds can carry the ethylene gas away from the fruit and slow the ripening process.
If you find that your tomatoes fall off the vine, either knocked off or due to frost, before they turn red, you can place the unripe tomatoes in a paper bag. Provided that the green tomatoes have reached the mature green stage, the paper bag will trap the ethylene and will help to ripen the tomatoes.


Why are my tomatoes not turning red on the vine?
Tomatoes won't turn red if it's too hot (above 85F) or too cold (below 50F). Also, as tomato plants mature through the summer, they can become huge and overgrown. When that happens, they tend to spend most of their energy on growing leaves and flowers, rather than ripening tomatoes.



You can just pick the red ones and leave the green to ripen off





Hope this has helped Neil
Any more questions just ask kev


Offline Eggy

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #482 on: September 20, 2020, 11:37:11 AM »
Took your tip and froze some cherry tomatoes , the other day. - Took a couple out, this morning , and after about an hour...... very tasty too. (I will probably try this with some biggies)
Cheers
Negg

Offline AJC51

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #483 on: September 22, 2020, 11:43:18 AM »



Help Kevin please can you identify this wild flower?
thanks hopefully
Al

Offline AJC51

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #484 on: September 22, 2020, 11:55:47 AM »


Help Kevin, 
Please can you also identify this wild flower as well please.
Thanks in anticipation.
Al

Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #485 on: September 22, 2020, 01:32:12 PM »



Help Kevin please can you identify this wild flower?
thanks hopefully
Al

HI

This is a Wild Carrot  Daucus carota

https://arillas.com/forum/index.php?topic=10517.270

kevin         I am looking at the other plant

Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #486 on: September 22, 2020, 01:46:46 PM »


Help Kevin, 
Please can you also identify this wild flower as well please.
Thanks in anticipation.
Al

HI
I think it is a Crepis, commonly known in some parts of the world as hawksbeard or hawk's-beard (but not to be confused with the related genus Hieracium with a similar common name),

I can not see the leaves so i might be wrong



Hope this as helped

kevin

Offline Eggy

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #487 on: September 22, 2020, 03:47:40 PM »
So much info.... I don't suppose you can pick the winner in the next race at Ascot??
Negg

Offline AJC51

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #488 on: September 22, 2020, 04:31:38 PM »
Kevin
Brilliant Many thanks, this makes sense the farmer had planted wild flowers in a strip at the edge of a filed of barley 10 x 400 metres including camomille borage chicory cornflowers sunflowers red campion lesser stitchwort and more. These were taken near Halstead in Essex unfortunately not Corfu.
Ariillas flights for us were cancelled this year back in April for June/July also both of us having tested postive in April we felt it unfair to Arillas to risk it at the time.
Glad you had or having a great time in our favourite place.
Take Care and Stay Safe
Al

Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #489 on: September 25, 2020, 11:00:00 AM »


HI

You will see this plant around Arillas i know Neil [EGGY] has one also the Tria has a small one

sago palm

Cycas revoluta Also known as  king sago, sago cycad, Japanese sago palm
A species of gymnosperm in the family Cycadaceae, native to southern Japan including the Ryukyu Islands. It is one of several species used for the production of sago, as well as an ornamental plant.

Family:   Cycadaceae
Genus:   Cycas
Species:   C. revoluta
Binomial name
Cycas revoluta

Cycads' only relation to the true palms (Arecaceae) is that both are seed plants. The Latin specific epithet revoluta means "curled back", in reference to the leaves. This is also called kungi (comb) palm in Urdu speaking areas.

The leaves are a deep semiglossy green and about 50–150 cm (20–59 in) long when the plants are of a reproductive age. They grow out into a feather-like rosette to 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. The crowded, stiff, narrow leaflets are 8–18 cm (3.1–7.1 in) long and have strongly recurved or revolute edges. The basal leaflets become more like spines. The petiole or stems of the sago cycad are 6–10 cm (2.4–3.9 in) long and have small protective barbs.
This very symmetrical plant supports a crown of shiny, dark green leaves on a thick shaggy trunk that is typically about 20 cm (7.9 in) in diameter, sometimes wider. The trunk is very low to subterranean in young plants, but lengthens above ground with age. It can grow into very old specimens with 6–7 m (over 20 feet) of trunk; however, the plant is very slow-growing and requires about 50–100 years to achieve this height. Trunks can branch several times, thus producing multiple heads of leaves
As with other cycads, it is dioecious, with the males bearing pollen cones (strobilus) and the females bearing groups of megasporophylls. Pollination can be done naturally by insects or artificially.
Sago palms only bloom once every three to four years with either male or female flowers. The flowers are actually more of a cone since sagos aren't really palms but are cycads, the original cone forming plants. Some gardeners find them unattractive.

This evergreen cycad is native to the tropical islands of southern Japan, but it grows well in the subtropics of the United States, particularly in Florida, California, Georgia, and Puerto Rico. Sago palm grows well in full sun or partial shade but exhibits larger leaves in more shaded situations can grow around the world in warmer climates
Temperature plays a key role in sago palm growth. The lowest temperature at which sago palms will grow is 15 °C. When temperatures are lower than 13 °C at the seedling stage, sago palms are not able to survive,
 the plant is becoming rare in the wild.






All parts of the Sago Palm are poisonous, but the seeds (nuts) are the most toxic to pets and are easier for them to eat than the prickly fronds. The Sago Palm toxin, called cycasin, attacks the liver causing a broad range of symptoms. toxins can cause vomiting, liver damage, and even death.
All Cycad plants, including sago palm, are extremely poisonous. Although many pets may find cycad plants very palatable and pleasing to chew on, all parts of this plant are highly toxic: leaves, trunk, roots, and seeds. ... Ingesting even one seed can kill a dog.




A single sago palm yields about 150–300 kg sago. This starch is an important item in the diet in some parts of Eastern Asia. It is used in various food items and also to stiffen cloth material in the textile industry.
used in landscape parks out side important buildings
Sago palm is known to be poisonous and sago separation includes careful processes to remove these toxins, before they are edible.




Health Benefits of Sago Palm
Healthy Blood Pressure
Sago has small amount of potassium which helps to maintain healthy blood pressure. Potassium acts as a vasodilator which helps to relax tension in blood vessels. It lowers blood pressure and reduces overall strain on cardiovascular system.

Offers energy
Calories are the main source of energy for human beings which offer power for all processes. It helps to keep energy levels and regulated over course of the day.

Assist muscle growth
It has some compounds which assist speed recovery of muscle. The daily intake of sago helps the muscles to work for longer and fasten repair as well as growth.

Nerve health
Sago helps to promote the nervous system functions. Nervous system requires electrolytes to be balanced to effectively communicate messages from the brain to every part of the body including muscles.

Culinary uses

Seeds are consumed raw or cooked.
Dried seeds are grounded into powder and mixed with brown rice and fermented into date miso or sotetsu miso.

The leaves are used in the treatment of cancer and hepatoma. The terminal shoot is astringent and diuretic. The seed is emmenagogue, expectorant and tonic. It is used in the treatment of rheumatism.

 The pollen is narcotic. The bark and the seeds are ground to a paste with oil and used as a poultice on sores and swellings. The juice of tender leaves is useful in the treatment of flatulence and vomiting.





Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #490 on: October 04, 2020, 11:02:22 AM »


HI

This is the time of year to start thinking about spring bulbs. I know your thinking we have'nt had the big fat man in a red suit yes christmas
You can see all types of bulbs in your local supermarkets and the DIY shops
If you are like me you garden is full of spring bulbs but there is still room for a few more in pots tubs and even hanging baskets i hear say ''hanging baskets'' yes just empty your hanging baskets of pelargoniums [Geraniums] then you can put Violas [garden pansy] and Primrose & Polyanthus with Dwarf Daffodil Bulbs only grow to about 6 inches

Knowing when to plant spring bulbs is important to guarantee a good display. Begin planting your spring flowering bulbs, corms and tubers between October and December, before the coldest winter weather sets in. You can plant them in containers or straight into borders, but as a rule of thumb, most bulbs should be planted at 3 times their depth. There are a few exceptions, so it's worth checking the planting depth table on the label or just look on the internet before you begin.
Plant tulips late November/December

Here is a list of bulbs you can use
1. Crocus
2. Fritillary
3. Daffodil
4. Hyacinth
5. Winter Aconite
6. Bluebell
7. Puschkinia 
8. Allium
9. Tulips
10. IRIS
11. ANEMONES
12. SNOWDROPS (GALANTHUS)
13.  GRAPE HYACINTHS (MUSCARI)

Naturalising bulbs
Many spring-flowering bulbs are ideal for brightening up the base of trees before they come into full leaf. The soil beneath trees is moist and light, offering the perfect growing conditions for scillas, anemones, erythroniums and crocuses.
Bulbs such as dwarf daffodils, crocuses, snowdrops and winter aconites can transform a dull looking lawn into a wonderful display of colour. To achieve a natural look, throw bulbs up in the air and plant them exactly where they land in the
grass. The aim is to make it look as though they have decided to grow there by themselves. Allow plants to die down after flowering before mowing over the lawn. Alternatively, plant bulbs in defined areas so that it's possible to mow the lawn around
Naturalise bulbs in lawns by taking a handful and dropping from waist height.
Plant where they land with a strong trowel or bulb planter - these are ideal for digging into heavy clay soil. To use, push the cylindrical blade down, twist and pull up a plug of soil.
Drop the bulb in, flattest side down, and crumble the plug into the hole.
In order to save time, try planting a large number of small bulbs by lifting a piece of turf and planting a group of bulbs in the soil.






Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #491 on: October 11, 2020, 01:34:20 PM »


HI

This plant you can see in Arillas and around Corfu also you can buy this at christmas


Belladonna lily

 Amaryllis Also Known as  Jersey lily, naked lady, amarillo, Easter lily in Southern Australia or, in South Africa, March lily due to its propensity to flower around March. This is one of numerous genera with the common name "lily" due to their flower shape and growth habit.
 is the only genus in the subtribe Amaryllidinae (tribe Amaryllideae). It is a small genus of flowering bulbs, with two species. The better known of the two, Amaryllis belladonna, is a native of the Western Cape region of South Africa, particularly the rocky southwest area between the Olifants River Valley and Knysna.
This is one of numerous genera with the common name "lily" due to their flower shape and growth habit. However, they are only distantly related to the true lily, Lilium. In the Victorian Language of Flowers, amaryllis means "pride"
Amaryllis is a bulbous plant, with each bulb being 5–10 cm (2.0–3.9 in) in diameter. It has several strap-shaped, hysteranthous, green leaves with midrib, 30–50 cm (12–20 in) long and 2–3 cm (0.79–1.18 in) broad, arranged in two rows.
Each bulb produces one or two leafless, stout, persistent and erect stems 30–60 cm tall, each of which bears at the top a cluster of two to twelve zygomorphic, funnel-shaped flowers without a tube. Each flower is 6–10 cm (2.4–3.9 in) diameter with six spreading tepals (three outer sepals, three inner petals, with similar appearance to each other). The usual color is white with crimson veins, but pink or purple also occur naturally.

Family:   Amaryllidaceae
Subfamily:   Amaryllidoideae
Tribe:   Amaryllideae
Genus:   Amaryllis L.
Type species
Amaryllis belladonna L.
Species
Amaryllis belladonna L.
Amaryllis paradisicola Snijman

The difference between Amaryllis and Hippeastrum?
Hippeastrum forms the leaves simultaneously with the peduncle, or they grow to flowering. In amaryllis, the peduncle is filled with tissue, in hippeastrum - hollow. Amaryllis flowers have a pleasant smell, hippeastrum flowers do not smell.

HABITAT
In areas of its native habitat with mountainous fynbos flowering tends to be suppressed until after bush fires as dense overhead vegetation prevents growth. In more open sandy areas of the Western Cape, the plant flowers annually. Plants tend to be very localized in dense concentrations due to the seeds' large size and heavy weight. Strong winds shake loose the seeds, which fall to ground and immediately start to germinate, aided by the first winter rains.

The name Amaryllis is taken from a shepherdess in Virgil's pastoral Eclogues, (from the Greek ἀμαρύσσω (amarysso), meaning "to sparkle") and also from "Amarella" for the bitterness of the bulb.
Although the 1987 decision settled the question of the scientific name of the genus, the common name "amaryllis" continues to be used differently. Bulbs sold as amaryllis and described as "ready to bloom for the holidays" belong to the allied genus Hippeastrum. The common name "naked lady" used for Amaryllis is also used for other bulbs with a similar growth and flowering pattern; some of these have their own widely used and accepted common names, such as the resurrection lily (Lycoris squamigera). The common name "naked lady" comes from the plant's pattern of flowering when the foliage has died down.

Amaryllis belladonna was introduced into cultivation at the beginning of the eighteenth century.
It reproduces slowly by either bulb division or seeds and has gradually naturalized from plantings in urban and suburban areas throughout the lower elevations and coastal areas in much of the West Coast of the USA since these environments mimic their native South African habitat. Hardiness zones 6–8. It is also naturalized in Australia.
There is an Amaryllis belladonna hybrid which was bred in the 1800s in Australia. No one knows the exact species it was crossed with to produce color variations of white, cream, peach, magenta and nearly red hues. The hybrids were crossed back onto the original Amaryllis belladonna and with each other to produce naturally seed-bearing crosses that come in a very wide range of flower sizes, shapes, stem heights and intensities of pink. Pure white varieties with bright green stems were bred as well. The hybrids are quite distinct in that the many shades of pink also have stripes, veining, darkened edges, white centers and light yellow centers, also setting them apart from the original light pink. In addition, the hybrids often produce flowers in a fuller circle rather than the "side-facing" habit of the "old-fashioned" pink. The hybrids are able to adapt to year-round watering and fertilization but can also tolerate completely dry summer conditions if need be.





In bloom is a common fixture in many households around the holidays, offering a respite of color for winter-weary eyes. The plant is considered poisonous to humans if ingested, primarily causing stomach upset if the bulb is ingested may cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, salivation and diarrhea.. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals also lists amaryllis as being toxic to both cats and dogs.



The Victorians associated amaryllis with strength and determination because of their height and sturdiness.
Amaryllis can also mean success, and are commonly given as gifts of hard-won achievement.
Amaryllis is a Greek female name that means “to sparkle”.
Amaryllis is popular at Christmas due to the colorful blooms that brighten up a winter landscape. The immense red and white blooms are well-suited for Christmas gifts and the showy blossoms enhance holiday decorations.



Certain species of Hippeastrum are high in alkaloids, specifically isoquinoline alkaloids. Alkaloids are organic compounds that have physiological effects on humans, so they are beneficial for creating medicines. Hippeastrum alkaloids help with depression, seizures, and anxiety.
The root is emetic and laxative. It is used to treat asthma, biliousness, and to induce vomiting
An infusion of the flowers is antispasmodic. It is recommended in the treatment of whooping cough







Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #492 on: October 12, 2020, 01:24:35 PM »


HI

For the above Amaryllis you can find them
Take the road behind the Galini and walk up the hill it is part of the Arillas trail you can see them near the top


Offline Eggy

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #493 on: October 12, 2020, 04:34:19 PM »
Kevin ... "Is that the road to Amaryllis??" - I liked that song!
Negg

Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #494 on: October 18, 2020, 11:33:43 AM »


 

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